Curriculum Social Studies Grade 4

Subject: 
Social Studies
Grade: 
Grade 4
Big Ideas: 
The pursuit of valuable natural resources has played a key role in changing the land, people, and communities of Canada.
Interactions between First Peoples and Europeans lead to conflict and cooperation, which continues to shape Canada’s identity.
Demographic changes in North America created shifts in economic and political power.
British Columbia followed
a unique path in becoming a
part of Canada.
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Construct arguments defending the significance of individuals/groups, places, events, or developments (significance)
  • Ask questions, corroborate inferences, and draw conclusions about the content and origins of different sources (evidence)
  • Sequence objects, images, or events, and determine continuities and changes between different time periods or places (continuity and change)
  • Differentiate between intended and unintended consequences of events, decisions, or developments, and speculate about alternative outcomes (cause and consequence)
  • Construct narratives that capture the attitudes, values, and worldviews commonly held by people at different times or places (perspective)
  • Make ethical judgments about events, decisions, or actions that consider the conditions of a particular time and place (ethical judgment)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Key skills:
      • Compare information and viewpoints about a selected problem or issue
      • Identify patterns in information, and use those patterns to draw inferences
      • Summarize information and opinions about a selected problem or issue
      • Use grids, scales, and legends on maps and timelines to interpret or represent specific information
      • Translate information from maps to other forms of communication and vice versa (e.g., write a paragraph describing what you see in a map, create a map based on an image or oral description)
      • Give reasons for using more than one source of information (e.g., differing points of view, currency of information, level of detail, reliability)
      • Apply a variety of strategies for information gathering (e.g., headings, indices, Internet searches)
      • Apply strategies for note taking and organizing information gathered from a variety of information sources
      • Distinguish between primary and secondary sources
      • Construct a simple bibliography
      • Organize information to plan a presentation
      • Prepare a presentation using selected communication forms (e.g., debate, diorama, multimedia presentation, dance) to support the purpose of the presentation
      • Apply established criteria for a presentation (e.g., historical accuracy and context)
      • Identify problems or issues that are local, national, and/or global in focus (e.g., natural disasters, endangered species, poverty, disease)
      • Clarify a selected problem or issue (e.g., provide details; state reasons, implications)
      • Create a plan of action to address a chosen problem or issue
  • Construct arguments defending the significance of individuals/groups, places, events, or developments:
    • Key questions:
      • What events are most significant in the story of BC’s development?
      • Should James Douglas be remembered as the father of BC?
      • What was the most significant reason for BC’s entry into Confederation?
  • Ask questions, corroborate inferences, and draw conclusions about the content and origins of different sources:
    • Sample activities:
      • Use primary sources to make inferences about contemporary attitudes toward First Peoples during the gold rush years
      • Compare and contrast European and First Peoples accounts of the same event 
  • Sequence objects, images, or events, and determine continuities and changes between different time periods or places:
    • Sample activity:
      • Create a timeline of key events in BC’s history
    • Key questions:
      • How have the economic centres of BC changed over time?
      • Why is Barkerville no longer a significant economic centre?
      • What resources are important to people in present-day BC compared to the past? Explain what has changed over time.
  • Differentiate between intended and unintended consequences of events, decisions, or developments, and speculate about alternative outcomes:
    • Sample activities:
      • Hold a debate about whether BC should have joined the United States or Canada, or become an independent country
      • Track the positive and negative effects of key events in BC’s development on First Peoples
    • Key questions:
      • Was joining Canada the best decision for BC?
      • Why did Vancouver become BC’s largest city?
  • Construct narratives that capture the attitudes, values, and worldviews commonly held by people at different times or places:
    • Sample activity:
      • Compare the “discovery” and “exploration” of North America from European and First Peoples perspectives
    • Key question:
      • Who benefited most from the early west coast fur trade: First Peoples or Europeans?
  • Make ethical judgments about events, decisions, or actions that consider the conditions of a particular time and place:
    • Sample activities:
      • Evaluate the fairness of BC’s treaty process
      • Describe the importance of protecting minority rights in a democracy
      • Identify key events and issues in First Peoples rights and interactions with early governments in Canada (e.g., the Indian Act, the establishment of the residential school system, potlatch ban, reserve system, treaties)
Concepts and Content: 
  • early contact, trade, cooperation, and conflict between First Peoples and European peoples
  • the fur trade in pre-Confederation Canada and British Columbia
  • demographic changes in pre-Confederation British Columbia in both First Peoples and non-First Peoples communities
  • economic and political factors that influenced the colonization of British Columbia and its entry into Confederation
  • the impact of colonization on First Peoples societies in British Columbia and Canada
  • the history of the local community and of local First Peoples communities
  • physiographic features and natural resources of Canada
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • early contact, trade, cooperation, and conflict between First Peoples and European peoples:
    • Sample topics:
      • early explorers: Cabot, Frobisher, Hudson, Cartier, Champlain
      • voyages of Cook and Vancouver
      • provision of muskets to First Peoples by Europeans
      • spread of horses to the Prairies
      • marriages between First Peoples and Europeans
      • colonial wars and alliances between Europeans and First Peoples (e.g., between Maquinna (Nuu-chah-nulth) and the Cook expedition or between French colonists and the First Peoples living around the Great Lakes)
    • Key questions:
      • What motivated explorers and settlers to come to Canada?
      • How did the geography of Canada affect European exploration?
  • the fur trade in pre-Confederation Canada and British Columbia:
    • Sample topics:
      • fur trading companies (e.g., the Hudson’s Bay Company and the North West Company)  
      • Beaver Wars
      • explorers: Simon Fraser, Alexander Mackenzie, David Thompson
      • Russian and Spanish trade on the coast
      • establishment of trading posts (e.g., Victoria, Fort Langley, and other forts; Metis communities)
    • Key question:
      • Why were trading posts established in particular locations?
  • demographic changes in pre-Confederation British Columbia in both First Peoples and non-First Peoples communities:
    • Sample topics:
      • disease
      • European and American settlement and migration
      • increases in raids causing decreases in population
      • relocation/resettlement of First Peoples
  • economic and political factors that influenced the colonization of British Columbia and its entry into Confederation:
    • Sample topics:
      • Canadian Pacific Railway
      • fur trade
      • American settlement
      • Oregon boundary dispute
      • gold rush population boom and bust
      • colonial debt
      • Canadian Confederation
      • expansion and purchase of Rupert’s Land
  • the impact of colonization on First Peoples societies in British Columbia and Canada:
    • Sample topics:
      • disease and demographics
      • trade
      • more complex political systems
      • loss of territory
      • impact on language and culture
      • key events and issues regarding First Peoples rights and interactions with early governments in Canada (e.g., the Indian Act, potlatch ban, reserve system, residential schools, treaties)
  • the history of the local community and of local First Peoples communities:
    • Sample topic:
      • local archives and museums
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
La quête des ressources naturelles de valeur a grandement contribué à transformer le territoire, les habitants et les communautés du Canada.
Les interactions entre les peuples autochtones et européens ont mené à des conflits et à des collaborations qui façonnent encore aujourd’hui l’identité canadienne.
Les changements démographiques survenus en Amérique du Nord ont entraîné des transferts dans les pouvoirs économiques et politiques.
La Colombie-Britannique a suivi un parcours historique particulier pour devenir une province canadienne.
 
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions
  • Élaborer des arguments pour défendre l’importance du rôle joué par une personne, un groupe, un lieu, un événement ou un développement (portée)
  • Poser des questions, corroborer des déductions par inférence et tirer des conclusions sur le contenu et la provenance de différentes sources (preuves)
  • Ordonner des objets, des images ou des événements, et relever les continuités et les changements entre différents lieux ou époques (continuité et changement)
  • Distinguer les conséquences intentionnelles et non intentionnelles des événements, des décisions ou des développements, et spéculer sur d’autres conséquences possibles (causes et conséquences)
  • Construire des récits qui dépeignent les attitudes, les valeurs et la vision du monde couramment adoptées par les personnes de différents lieux ou époques (perspective)
  • Porter des jugements éthiques sur des événements, des décisions ou des actions après avoir pris en considération les conditions propres à une époque et à un lieu (jugement éthique)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions:
    • Compétences clés :
      • relever des récurrences dans les informations, et faire des déductions par inférence à partir de celles-ci
      • synthétiser l’information et les opinions sur un problème ou une question
      • utiliser une grille cartographique, une échelle et une légende sur une carte ou un schéma chronologique pour interpréter ou représenter de l’information
      • mettre en pratique diverses stratégies de collecte d’information (p. ex. sous-titres, index, recherche sur Internet)
      • préparer une bibliographie informelle
      • préparer une présentation en utilisant une forme de communication choisie (p. ex. débat, diorama, présentation multimédia, danse) pour appuyer l’objet de sa présentation
      • appliquer des critères à une présentation (p. ex. exactitude des faits historiques, contexte historique)
      • déterminer et clarifier un problème ou une question (p. ex. en donner les détails, en relever les causes et les conséquences)
      • créer un plan d’action pour aborder un problème ou une question
  • Élaborer des arguments pour défendre le rôle significatif joué par une personne, un groupe, un lieu, un événement ou un développement:
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels sont les événements dont le rôle a été très significatif dans l’histoire de la Colombie-Britannique?
      • James Douglas devrait-il être considéré comme le père fondateur de la Colombie-Britannique?
      • Quelle est la principale raison pour laquelle la Colombie-Britannique a fait son entrée dans la Confédération?
  • Poser des questions, corroborer des déductions par inférence et tirer des conclusions sur le contenu et la provenance de différentes sources:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • à l’aide de sources primaires, faire des déductions par inférence sur les attitudes à l’égard des peuples autochtones à l’époque de la ruée vers l’or
      • comparer les récits européens et les récits autochtones d’un même événement 
  • Ordonner des objets, des images ou des événements, et relever les continuités et les changements entre différents lieux ou époques:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • placer les événements clés de l’histoire de la Colombie-Britannique sur un schéma chronologique
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment les centres économiques de la Colombie-Britannique ont-ils changé avec le temps?
      • Pourquoi Barkerville n’est-elle plus un grand centre économique?
      • Quelles ressources sont importantes pour les Britanno-Colombiens d’aujourd’hui, par rapport à ceux d’autrefois? Expliquer ce qui a changé avec le temps.
  • Distinguer les conséquences intentionnelles et non intentionnelles des événements, des décisions ou des développements, et spéculer sur d’autres conséquences possibles:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • tenir un débat sur la question suivante : « La Colombie-Britannique a-t-elle bien fait de se joindre au Canada? Aurait-elle mieux fait de se joindre aux États-Unis, ou encore de devenir un pays indépendant? »
      • relever les conséquences positives et négatives pour les peuples autochtones d’événements marquants de l’histoire de la Colombie-Britannique
    • Questions clés :
      • L’adhésion au Canada était-elle la meilleure décision pour la Colombie-Britannique?
      • Pourquoi Vancouver est-elle devenue la plus grande ville de la Colombie-Britannique?
  • Construire des récits qui dépeignent les attitudes, les valeurs et la vision du monde couramment adoptées par les personnes de différents lieux ou époques:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • comparer la « découverte » et l’« exploration » de l’Amérique du Nord du point de vue des peuples européens et du point de vue des peuples autochtones
    • Question clé :
      • Qui a profité le plus du commerce de la fourrure sur la côte Ouest : les peuples autochtones ou les peuples européens?
  • Porter des jugements éthiques sur des événements, des décisions ou des actions après avoir pris en considération les conditions propres à une époque et à un lieu:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • évaluer l’équité du processus de traités de la Colombie-Britannique
      • mesurer l’importance de protéger les droits des minorités dans une démocratie
      • relever les événements marquants et les questions clés au chapitre des droits des peuples autochtones et de leurs interactions avec les premiers gouvernements du Canada (p. ex. Loi sur les Indiens, établissement du système de pensionnats, interdiction du potlatch, système de réserves, traités)
content_fr: 
  • Les premiers contacts, le commerce, la collaboration et les conflits entre les peuples autochtones et européens
  • Le commerce de la fourrure dans le Canada et la Colombie-Britannique d’avant la Confédération
  • Les changements démographiques au sein des peuples autochtones et non autochtones dans la Colombie-Britannique d’avant la Confédération
  • Les facteurs économiques et politiques qui ont influencé la colonisation de la Colombie-Britannique et son entrée dans la Confédération
  • Les conséquences de la colonisation sur les sociétés autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique et du Canada
  • L’histoire de la communauté locale et des communautés autochtones locales
  • Les caractéristiques physiographiques et les ressources naturelles du Canada
content elaborations fr: 
  • Les premiers contacts, le commerce, la collaboration et les conflits entre les peuples autochtones et européens:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les premiers explorateurs : Cabot, Frobisher, Hudson, Cartier, Champlain
      • les voyages de Cook et de Vancouver
      • la vente de fusils aux peuples autochtones par les peuples européens
      • l’introduction du cheval dans les Prairies
      • les mariages entre Autochtones et Européens
      • les guerres coloniales et les alliances entre les peuples européens et les peuples autochtones (p. ex. entre Maquinna [Nuu-chah-nulth] et l’expédition Cook, ou entre les colons français et les peuples autochtones des Grands Lacs)
    • Questions clés :
      • Qu’est-ce qui a motivé les explorateurs et les colons à venir au Canada?
      • Comment la géographie du Canada a-t-elle influencé l’exploration européenne?
  • Le commerce de la fourrure dans le Canada et la Colombie-Britannique d’avant la Confédération:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les compagnies de commerce de la fourrure (p. ex. la Compagnie de la Baie d’Hudson et la Compagnie du Nord-Ouest)  
      • les guerres franco-iroquoises
      • les explorateurs : Simon Fraser, Alexander Mackenzie, David Thompson
      • le commerce russe et espagnol sur la côte
      • l’établissement de postes de traite (p. ex. Victoria, Fort Langley et autres forts; communautés métisses)
    • Question clé :
      • Pourquoi les postes de traite étaient-ils établis à certains endroits stratégiques?
  • Les changements démographiques au sein des peuples autochtones et non autochtones dans la Colombie-Britannique d’avant la Confédération:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • maladie
      • peuplement et migration européenne et américaine
      • augmentation des raids et diminution de la population
      • déplacement et relocalisation des peuples autochtones
  • Les facteurs économiques et politiques qui ont influencé la colonisation de la Colombie-Britannique et son entrée dans la Confédération:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • le chemin de fer Canadien Pacifique
      • le commerce de la fourrure
      • le peuplement des États-Unis
      • le conflit frontalier de l’Oregon
      • le boom démographique de la ruée vers l’or, et le déclin qui a suivi
      • la dette coloniale
      • la Confédération canadienne
      • l’expansion et l’achat de la Terre de Rupert
  • Les conséquences de la colonisation sur les sociétés autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique et du Canada:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • maladie et démographie
      • commerce
      • systèmes politiques plus complexes
      • perte de territoire
      • répercussions sur la langue et la culture
      • les principaux événements et enjeux relatifs aux droits des peuples autochtones et à leurs interactions avec les premiers gouvernements du Canada (p. ex. Loi sur les Indiens,interdiction du potlatch, système de réserves, pensionnats, traités)
  • L’histoire de la communauté et des communautés autochtones locales:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • archives et musées de la région
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes