Curriculum Sciences humaines et sociales Grade 10

Subject: 
Social Studies
Grade: 
Grade 10
Big Ideas: 
Global and regional conflicts have been a powerful force in shaping our contemporary world and identities.
The development of political institutions is influenced by economic, social, ideological, and geographic factors.
Worldviews lead to different perspectives and ideas about developments in Canadian society.
Historical and contemporary injustices challenge the narrative and identity of Canada as an inclusive, multicultural society.
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas and data; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments, and compare varying perspectives on their significance at particular times and places, and from group to group (significance)
  • Assess the justification for competing accounts after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence, including data (evidence)
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups at particular times and places (continuity and change)
  • Assess how underlying conditions and the actions of individuals or groups influence events, decisions, or developments, and analyze multiple consequences (cause and consequence)
  • Explain and infer different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about actions in the past and present, and assess appropriate ways to remember and respond (ethical judgment)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas and data; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Key skills:
      • Draw conclusions about a problem, an issue, or a topic.
      • Assess and defend a variety of positions on a problem, an issue, or a topic.
      • Demonstrate leadership by planning, implementing, and assessing strategies to address a problem or an issue.
      • Identify and clarify a problem or issue.
      • Evaluate and organize collected data (e.g., in outlines, summaries, notes, timelines, charts).
      • Interpret information and data from a variety of maps, graphs, and tables.
      • Interpret and present data in a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, and graphic).
      • Accurately cite sources.
      • Construct graphs, tables, and maps to communicate ideas and information, demonstrating appropriate use of grids, scales, legends, and contours.
  • Assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments, and compare varying perspectives on their significance at particular times and places, and from group to group (significance):
    • Key questions:
      • How relevant is Canadian content in a global digital world?
      • What is the role of place in Canadians’ sense of belonging and identity?
    • Sample activities:
      • Select significant people to include in a museum display on women’s suffrage.
    • Determine how the significance of Vimy Ridge has changed since the dedication of the Vimy Memorial.
  • Assess the justification for competing accounts after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence, including data (evidence):
    • Key question:
      • Whose stories are told and whose stories are missing in the narratives of Canadian history?
    • Sample activities:
      • Assess the coverage of significant political decisions from different media outlets.
      • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical judgments in a variety of sources.
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups at particular times and places (continuity and change):
    • Key questions:
      • How has the Canadian government’s relationship with First Peoples regarding treaties and land use changed or stayed the same?
      • How have Canada’s immigration and refugee policies changed?
      • How has Canadian identity changed or stayed the same?
  • Assess how underlying conditions and the actions of individuals or groups influence events, decisions, or developments, and analyze multiple consequences (cause and consequence):
    • Key questions:
      • To what extent have First Peoples influenced the development of economic and political policy in Canada?
      • How do humans’ relationships with land impact political and economic ideologies?
      • How do different political parties address historical or contemporary problems?
      • What are the causes and consequences of Canada’s multiculturalism policies?
      • To what extent do citizens influence the legislative process?
  • Explain and infer different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective):
    • Key question:
      • How do art, media, and innovation inform a shared collective identity?
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about actions in the past and present, and assess appropriate ways to remember and respond (ethical judgment):
    • Key questions:
      • To what extent has Canada’s multiculturalism policy been successfully implemented?
      • How successful has Canada’s bilingual policy been, and to what extent is it still necessary?
      • What are the strengths and limitations of different forms of government?
      • Should the Canadian Senate be abolished, reformed, replaced, or maintained?
      • Should the electoral system in Canada be reformed?
      • What are the strengths and limitations of the Indian Act for First Peoples?
Concepts and Content: 
  • government, First Peoples governance, political institutions, and ideologies
  • environmental, political, and economic policies
  • Canadian autonomy
  • Canadian identities
  • discriminatory policies and injustices in Canada and the world, including residential schools, the head tax, the Komagata Maru incident, and internments   
  • advocacy for human rights, including findings and recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission
  • domestic conflicts and co-operation
  • international conflicts and co-operation
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • government, First Peoples governance, political institutions, and ideologies:
    • Sample topics:
      • forms of government and decision-making models (e.g., parliamentary democracy, constitutional monarchy, consensus, autocracy, republic, monarchy, democracy, theocracy)
      • consensus-based governance (e.g., Nunavut) and First Peoples self-governance models (e.g., Sechelt, Nisga'a, Tsawwassen)  
      • models for classifying political and economic ideologies (e.g., linear left/right; two-dimensional, such as political compass)
      • ideologies (e.g., socialism, communism, capitalism, fascism, liberalism, conservatism, environmentalism, libertarianism, authoritarianism, feminism)
      • levels and branches of government:
        • local, regional, territorial, provincial, federal
        • executive, legislative, judicial
      • Indian Act:
        • Crown- and federal government–imposed governance structures on First Peoples communities (e.g., band councils)
        • title, treaties, and land claims (e.g., Nisga'a Treaty, Haida Gwaii Strategic Land Use Decision, Tsilhqot'in decision)
      • Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
      • elections and electoral systems:
        • election campaigns
        • minority and majority governments
        • proposals for electoral reform and alternative election systems
  • environmental, political, and economic policies: 
    • Sample topics:
      • environmental issues, including climate change, renewable energy, overconsumption, water quality, food security, conservation
      • stakeholders (e.g., First Peoples; industry and corporate leaders; local citizens; grassroots movements; special interest groups, including environmental organizations)
      • other considerations in policy development, including cultural, societal, spiritual, land use, environmental
      • social welfare programs (e.g., health care, education, basic income)
      • national programs and projects:
        • national climate strategy, including carbon pricing and ending of coal-fired electricity generation
        • stimulus programs, infrastructure projects
      • trade agreements:
        • NAFTA (North America Free Trade Agreement)
        • Trans-Pacific Partnership
  • Canadian autonomy:
    • Sample topics:
      • Canada and Britain (e.g., World War I; Statute of Westminster; Constitution Act, 1982)
      • Canada and the United States (e.g., free trade, bilateral defence, Montreal Protocol on acid rain)
      • Canada and the world (e.g., League of Nations, World War II, United Nations, Paris Climate Agreement)
      • Canada (treaties with First Peoples, Quebec sovereignty movements)
  • Canadian identities:
    • Sample topics:
      • First Peoples identities (e.g., status, non-status, First Nations, Metis, Inuit)
      • Francophone identities (e.g., Franco-Ontarian, Acadian, Quebecois, Metis, bilingual)
      • immigration and multiculturalism:
        • immigration and refugee policies and practices
        • bilingualism and biculturalism (Official Languages Act)
        • multiculturalism policy (Canadian Multiculturalism Act)
        • cultural identities of subsequent generations (e.g., second-generation Japanese Canadian versus Canadian of Japanese descent versus Canadian)
      • manifestations or representations :
        • First Peoples arts, traditions, languages
        • place-based identities and sense of belonging (e.g., Haida Gwaii versus Queen Charlotte Islands; “up North” and “back East”; affinity for ocean air, wide-open spaces; spiritual ancestors)
        • media and art (e.g., CBC radio and television, Group of Seven, National Film Board, Canadian content)
        • scientific and technological innovations (e.g., snowmobile, insulin)
        • sports and international sporting events (e.g., hockey, Olympics)
  • discriminatory policies and injustices in Canada and the world, including residential schools, the head tax, the Komagata Maru incident, and internments:
    • Sample topics:
      • women’s rights:
        • women’s suffrage, the Persons Case
        • the Royal Commission on the Status of Women (RCSW)
        • contraceptives and abortion
        • sexism
      • LGBT2Q+:
        • same-sex marriage
        • decriminalization of homosexuality
        • LGBT2Q+ civil liberties
        • sexism
      • national or ethnic discrimination:
        • Chinese Immigration Act
        • World War I internments (e.g., nationals of German, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires, including ethnic Ukrainians)
        • Denial of Jewish immigrants in interwar years
        • World War II internments (e.g., Japanese, Italian, German)
        • Indian Act (e.g., residential schools, voting rights, reserves and pass system, Sixties Scoop, and the White Paper)
        • Africville
      • political discrimination:
        • persecution, detention, and expulsion of suspected agitators
      • discrimination on intellectual and physical grounds:
        • employment and inclusion rights
        • institutionalization
        • forced sterilizations
  • advocacy for human rights, including findings and recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission:
    • Sample topics:
      • Truth and Reconciliation Commission report and calls to action (e.g., access to elders and First Peoples healing practices for First Peoples patients; appropriate commemoration ceremonies and burial markers for children who died at residential schools)
      • human rights tribunals
      • Canadian Bill of Rights and Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
      • Supreme Court challenges
      • international declarations (e.g., UN Declaration on the Rights of the Child; UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples)
      • anti-racism education and actions
      • First Peoples protest and advocacy movements (e.g., National Indian Brotherhood, Oka Crisis, Idle No More)
      • other protest and advocacy movements (e.g., Pride, women’s liberation, inclusion)
      • redress movements for historic wrongs (e.g., Japanese-Canadian Legacy Project, Truth and Reconciliation)
      • federal and provincial apologies (e.g., apology for Chinese Head Tax and Chinese Exclusion Act; Chinese Historical Wrongs Consultation Final Report and Recommendations regarding head tax and discriminatory treatment of Chinese immigrants; apologies for internments, residential schools, Komagata Maru)
  • domestic conflicts and co-operation:
    • Sample topics:
      • Canadian constitutional issues:
        • Meech Lake Accord
        • Charlottetown Accord
        • Calgary Declaration
      • Quebec sovereignty:
        • Quiet Revolution
        • October Crisis
        • Parti Québécois
        • Bloc Québécois
        • Bill 101
        • 1980 and 1995 referenda
      • First Peoples actions:
        • involvement in Meech Lake Accord
        • Oka Crisis, Gustafsen Lake Standoff, Ipperwash Crisis, Shannon’s Dream (Attawapiskat)
        • Idle No More
      • national and regional First Peoples organizations:
        • National Indian Brotherhood
        • Assembly of First Nations
  • international conflicts and co-operation:
    • Sample topics:
      • global armed conflicts and Canada’s role in them (e.g., World War II, Korea, Suez, Cyprus, Gulf War, Somalia, Rwanda, Yugoslavia, Afghanistan, Syria)
      • non-participation in global armed conflicts (e.g., Chanak Crisis, Vietnam War, Iraq War)
      • involvement in international organizations and agreements, including League of Nations, United Nations, La Francophonie, Commonwealth, NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization), Group of Seven (G7), NORAD (North American Aerospace Defense Command), APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation), WTO (World Trade Organization), Paris Climate Agreement, Great Lakes–Saint Lawrence River Basin Sustainable Water Resources Agreement, Ottawa Treaty
      • support of non-governmental organizations (NGOs)
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
Les conflits mondiaux et régionaux constituent autant de forces puissantes qui ont façonné le monde et les identités d’aujourd’hui.
Les facteurs économiques, sociaux, idéologiques et géographiques influent sur le développement des institutions politiques.
Les visions du monde donnent lieu à différentes perspectives et idées sur l’évolution de la société canadienne.
Les injustices historiques et contemporaines remettent en question le discours dominant et l'identité du Canada en tant que société multiculturelle et ouverte à tous.
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les démarches d'investigation liées à l'étude des sciences humaines et sociales pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées; et communiquer ses résultats et ses conclusions
  • Évaluer l'importance que peuvent prendre les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses, et comparer différents points de vue en la matière selon les lieux, les époques et les groupes (portée)
  • Déterminer ce qui sous-tend les récits contradictoires après avoir étudié les points de divergeance, la fiabilité des sources et le bien-fondé des preuves, notamment les données (preuves)
  • Comparer et opposer les éléments de continuité et de changement selon les groupes, les lieux et les époques (continuité et changement)
  • Évaluer dans quelle mesure la conjoncture et les actions individuelles ou collectives influent sur les événements, les décisions ou le cours des choses, et en analyser les multiples conséquences (causes et conséquences)
  • Expliquer et inférer différents points de vue au sujet de personnes, de lieux, d'enjeux ou d'événements du passé ou du présent, en tenant compte des normes, des valeurs, des visions du monde et des croyances dominantes (perspective)
  • Porter des jugements éthiques raisonnés sur des actions du passé et du présent, et déterminer s des façons appropriées d'en garder le souvenir et y réagir (jugement éthique)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les démarches d’investigation liées à l’étude des sciences humaines et sociales pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées; et communiquer ses résultats et ses conclusions :
    • Compétences clés :
      • Tirer des conclusions sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • Évaluer et défendre divers points de vue sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • Faire preuve d’initiative en planifiant, en adoptant et en évaluant des stratégies pour aborder un problème ou une question
      • Relever et clarifier un problème ou une question
      • Évaluer et organiser les données recueillies (p. ex. à partir de plans, de sommaires, de notes, de schémas chronologiques, de tableaux)
      • Interpréter l’information et les données provenant de cartes, graphiques et tableaux divers
      • Interpréter et présenter de l’information ou des données sous diverses formes (p. ex. orale, écrite et graphique)
      • Citer ses sources avec exactitude
      • Préparer des graphiques, des tableaux et des cartes pour communiquer des idées et de l’information, en démontrant un usage approprié des grilles, des échelles, des légendes et des courbes
  • Évaluer l’importance que peuvent prendre les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses, et comparer différents points de vue en la matière selon les lieux, les époques et les groupes :
    • Questions clés :
      • À quel point le contenu canadien est-il pertinent dans l’univers numérique mondialisé?
      • Quel est le rôle de l’espace dans le sentiment d’appartenance et d’identité de la population canadienne?
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • Choisir des personnages importants à intégrer dans une exposition dans un musée portant sur le droit de vote des femmes
      • Étudier comment l’importance de la crête de Vimy a évolué depuis la consécration du Mémorial de Vimy
  • Déterminer ce qui sous-tend les récits contradictoires après avoir étudié les points de divergeance, la fiabilité des sources et le bien-fondé des preuves, notamment les données (preuves) :
    • Questions clés :
      • À qui les histoires se réfèrent-elles? Quelles sont celles qui manquent dans  l’histoire canadienne telle qu’elle est relatée?
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • Évaluer la couverture médiatique des décisions politiques d’importance selon les différents médias
      • Reconnaître les jugements éthiques implicites et explicites dans une variété de sources
  • Comparer et opposer les éléments de continuité et de changement selon les groupes, les lieux et les époques :
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment la relation du gouvernement canadien avec les peuples autochtones, en ce qui concerne les traités et l’utilisation des terres, a-t-elle évolué? Est-elle restée la même?
      • Comment les politiques canadiennes envers l’immigration et les réfugiés ont-elles évolué?
      • Comment l’identité canadienne a-t-elle évolué? Est-elle restée la même?
  • Évaluer dans quelle mesure la conjoncture et les actions individuelles ou collectives influent sur les événements, les décisions ou le cours des choses, et en analyser les multiples conséquences :
    • Questions clés :
      • Jusqu’à quel point les peuples autochtones ont-ils influencé le développement de la politique économique et sociale du Canada?
      • Comment les relations entre l’homme et la terre influent-elles sur les idéologies politiques et économiques?
      • Comment différents partis politiques abordent-ils les problèmes historiques ou contemporains?
      • Quelles sont les causes et les conséquences de la politique du multiculturalisme du Canada?
      • Jusqu’à quel point les citoyens exercent-ils un impact sur le processus législatif?
  • Expliquer et inférer différents points de vue au sujet de personnes, de lieux, d’enjeux ou d’événements du passé ou du présent, en tenant compte des normes, des valeurs, des visions du monde et des croyances dominantes (perspective) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment l’art, les médias et l’innovation contribuent-ils à une identité collective partagée?
  • Porter des jugements éthiques raisonnés sur des actions du passé et du présent, et déterminer s des façons appropriées d’en garder le souvenir et y réagir :
    • Questions clés :
      • Jusqu’à quel point la mise en œuvre de la politique du Canada en matière de multiculturalisme a-t-elle été fructueuse?
      • Jusqu’à quel point la politique du Canada en matière de bilinguisme a-t-elle été fructueuse, et dans quelle mesure est-elle toujours nécessaire?
      • Quelles sont les forces et les limites des différentes formes de gouvernement?
      • Devrait-on abolir, réformer, remplacer ou maintenir le Sénat du Canada?
      • Le système électoral du Canada devrait-il faire l’objet de réformes?
      • Quelles sont les forces et les limites de la Loi sur les Indiens du point de vue des peuples autochtones?
content_fr: 
  • Gouvernement, institutions politiques pour la gouvernance des peuples autochtones et idéologies
  • Politiques environnementales, pratiques politiques et politiques économiques
  • Autonomie du Canada
  • Identités canadiennes
  • Politiques discriminatoires et injustices au Canada et dans le monde, y compris les pensionnats autochtones, la taxe d’entrée, l’incident du Komagata Maru et les internements
  • Défense des droits de la personne, y compris résultats et recommandations de la Commission de vérité et de réconciliation
  • Coopération et conflits intérieurs
  • Coopération et conflits internationaux
 
    content elaborations fr: 
    • Gouvernement, institutions politiques pour la gouvernance des peuples autochtones et idéologies :
      • Exemples de sujets :
        • formes de gouvernement et modèles de prise de décisions (p. ex. démocratie parlementaire, monarchie constitutionnelle, consensus, autocratie, république, monarchie, démocratie, théocratie)
        • gouvernance fondée sur le consensus (p. ex. Nunavut) et modèles de gouvernance des peuples autochtones (p. ex. Sechelt, Nisga'a, Tsawwassen)
        • modèles pour classifier les idéologies politiques et économiques (p. ex. linéaire gauche/droite, bidimensionnelle, notamment boussole politique)
        • idéologies (p. ex. socialisme, communisme, capitalisme, fascisme, libéralisme, conservatisme, environnementalisme, libertarianisme, autoritarisme, féminisme)
        • échelons et pouvoirs du gouvernement :
          • local, régional, territorial, provincial, fédéral
          • exécutif, législatif, judiciaire
        • Loi sur les Indiens :
          • structures de gouvernance imposées par la Couronne ou le gouvernement fédéral aux communautés autochtones (p. ex. conseils de bande)
          • titres ancestraux, traités et revendications territoriales (p. ex. traité Nisga'a, entente sur l’utilisation stratégique d’occupation des terres de Haida Gwaii, décision de justice Tsilhqot'in)
        • Charte canadienne des droits et libertés
        • élections et systèmes électoraux :
          • campagnes électorales
          • gouvernements majoritaires et minoritaires
          • propositions de réforme électorale et de systèmes électoraux alternatifs
    • Politiques environnementales, pratiques politiques et politiques économiques :
      • Exemples de sujets :
        • sujets environnementaux, notamment changement climatique, énergies renouvelables, surconsommation, qualité de l’eau, sécurité alimentaire, conservation
        • parties prenantes (p. ex. peuples autochtones, chefs de file de l’industrie et dirigeants d’entreprises, citoyens locaux, mouvements populaires, groupes d’intérêt spécial, y compris organisations environnementales)
        • autres considérations liées à l’élaboration des politiques, notamment sur les plans culturel, sociétal, spirituel, environnemental et en matière d’utilisation des terres
        • programmes de bien-être social (p. ex. soins de santé, éducation, revenu de base)
        • programmes et projets nationaux :
          • stratégie climatique nationale, notamment tarification du carbone et abandon de la production d’électricité à partir du charbon
          • programmes de relance, projets d’infrastructure
        • accords commerciaux :
          • ALENA (Accord de libre-échange canado-américain)
          • Partenariat transpacifique
    • Autonomie du Canada :
      • Exemples de sujets :
        • Canada et Grande-Bretagne (p. ex. Première Guerre mondiale, Statut de Westminster, Loi constitutionnelle de 1982)
        • Canada et États-Unis (p. ex. libre-échange, défense bilatérale, Protocole de Montréal sur les pluies acides)
        • Canada et le monde (p. ex. Société des Nations, Seconde Guerre mondiale, Nations Unies, Accord de Paris sur le climat)
        • Canada (traités avec les peuples autochtones, mouvements de souveraineté du Québec)
    • Identités canadiennes :
      • Exemples de sujets :
        • identités des peuples autochtones (p. ex Indiens inscrits et non inscrits, Premières Nations, Métis, Inuits)
        • identités francophones (p. ex. Franco-Ontariens, Acadiens, Québécois, Métis, bilingues)
        • immigration et multiculturalisme :
          • politiques et pratiques concernant l’immigration et les réfugiés
          • bilinguisme et biculturalisme (Loi sur les langues officielles)
          • politique du multiculturalisme (Loi sur le multiculturalisme canadien)
          • identités culturelles des nouvelles générations (p. ex. Canadien d’origine japonaise de deuxième génération, Canadien d’ascendance japonaise et Canadien)
        • manifestations ou représentations :
          • arts, traditions, langues des peuples autochtones
          • identités rattachées à un lieu et sentiment d’appartenance (p. ex. « Haida Gwaii » et« des îles de la Reine-Charlotte »; « du Nord » et « de l’Est »; affinité avec l’air marin, les espaces sauvages; ancêtres spirituels)
          • médias et arts (p. ex. radio et télévision de Radio-Canada, Groupe des sept, Office national du film, contenu canadien)
          • innovations scientifiques et technologiques (p. ex. motoneige, insuline)
          • sports et événements sportifs internationaux (p. ex. hockey, Jeux olympiques)
    • Politiques discriminatoires et injustices au Canada et dans le monde, y compris les pensionnats autochtones, la taxe d’entrée, l’incident du Komagata Maru et les internements :
      • Exemples de sujets :
        • droits des femmes :
          • vote des femmes, l’affaire « personne »
          • Commission royale d’enquête sur la situation de la femme au Canada
          • contraception et avortement
          • sexisme
        • LGBT2Q+ :
          • mariage entre personnes de même sexe
          • décriminalisation de l’homosexualité
          • libertés civiles pour les LGBT2Q+
          • sexisme
        • discrimination nationale ou ethnique :
          • Loi sur l’immigration chinoise
          • internements pendant la Première Guerre mondiale (p. ex. ressortissants de l’Allemagne, des empires ottoman et austro-hongrois, y compris les Ukrainiens)
          • rejet d’immigrants juifs dans l’entre-deux-guerres
          • internements pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale (p. ex. Japonais, Italiens, Allemands)
          • Loi sur les Indiens (p. ex. pensionnats autochtones, droit de vote, réserves et système de laissez-passer, rafle des années soixante et Livre blanc)
          • Africville
        • discrimination politique :
          • persécution, détention et expulsion d’agitateurs présumés
        • discrimination pour motifs intellectuels ou physiques :
          • droits relatifs à l’emploi et à l’inclusion
          • institutionnalisation
          • stérilisations forcées
    • Défense des droits de la personne, y compris résultats et recommandations de la Commission de vérité et de réconciliation :
      • Exemples de sujets :
        • rapport et appels à l’action de la Commission de vérité et de réconciliation (p. ex. accès aux pratiques thérapeutiques des aînés et des peuples autochtones pour les patients autochtones, cérémonies de commémoration et monuments funéraires appropriés pour les enfants morts dans les pensionnats autochtones)
        • tribunaux des droits de la personne
        • Déclaration canadienne des droits et Charte canadienne des droits et libertés
        • contestations en Cour Suprême
        • déclarations internationales (p. ex. Déclaration des Nations Unies sur les droits de l’enfantDéclaration sur les droits des peuples autochtones)
        • éducation et actions contre le racisme
        • mouvements de protection et de défense des peuples autochtones (p. ex. Fraternité nationale des Indiens [aujourd’hui Assemblée des Premières Nations], Crise d’Oka, mouvement Idle No More (Jamais plus l’inaction)
        • autres mouvements de protestation et de défense des droits (p. ex. Fierté, libération des femmes, inclusion)
        • mouvements de réparation des torts historiques (p. ex. Japanese-Canadian Legacy Project [projet relatif à l’héritage culturel nippo-canadien], Vérité et réconciliation)
        • excuses des gouvernements fédéral et provinciaux (p. ex. excuses pour avoir imposé une taxe d’entrée aux immigrants chinois et pour la Loi de l’immigration chinoise, rapport final et recommandations découlant de la consultation sur les torts historiques causés aux personnes d’origine chinoise, notamment la taxe d’entrée et le traitement discriminatoire des immigrants chinois, excuses pour les internements, pensionnats autochtones, incident du Komagata Maru)
    • Coopération et conflits intérieurs :
      • Exemples de sujets :
        • enjeux constitutionnels canadiens :
          • Accord du lac Meech
          • Accord de Charlottetown
          • Déclaration de Calgary
        • souveraineté du Québec :
          • Révolution tranquille
          • Crise d’octobre
          • Parti Québécois
          • Bloc Québécois
          • Loi 101
          • référendums de 1980 et de 1995
        • actions des peuples autochtones :
          • participation à l’Accord du lac Meech
          • crise d’Oka, affrontement du lac Gustafsen, crise d’Ipperwash, rêve de Shannon (Attawapiskat)
          • mouvement Idle No More (Jamais plus l’inaction)
        • organisations nationales et régionales des peuples autochtones :
          • Fraternité nationale des Indiens
          • Assemblée des Premières Nations
    • Coopération et conflits internationaux :
      • Exemples de sujets :
        • conflits armés dans le monde et rôle du Canada dans ces conflits (p. ex. Seconde Guerre mondiale, Corée, Suez, Chypre, guerre du Golfe, Somalie, Rwanda, Yougoslavie, Afghanistan, Syrie)
        • non-participation à des conflits armés dans le monde (p. ex. crise de Chanak, guerre du Vietnam, guerre d’Iraq)
        • participation à des organisations internationales et intervention dans leurs accords, notamment : Société des Nations, Nations Unies, La Francophonie, Commonwealth, OTAN (Organisation du Traité de l’Atlantique Nord), Groupe des Sept (G7), NORAD (Commandement de la défense aérospatiale de l’Amérique du Nord), APEC (Coopération économique Asie-Pacifique), OMC (Organisation mondiale du commerce), Accord de Paris sur le climat, Entente sur les ressources en eau durables du bassin des Grands Lacs et du fleuve Saint-Laurent, Traité d’Ottawa
        • soutien aux organisations non gouvernementales (ONG)
    PDF Only: 
    No
    Curriculum Status: 
    2018/19
    Has French Translation: 
    Yes