Curriculum Peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique 12e

Subject: 
B.C. First Peoples
Grade: 
Grade 12
Big Ideas: 
The identities, worldviews, and languages of B.C. First Peoples are renewed, sustained, and transformed through their connection to the land.
The impact of contact and colonialism continues to affect the political, social, and economic lives of B.C. First Peoples.
Cultural expressions convey the richness, diversity, and resiliency of B.C. First Peoples.
Through self-governance, leadership, and self-determination, B.C. First Peoples challenge and resist Canada's ongoing colonialism.
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Assess the significance of people, events, places, issues, or developments in the past and present (significance)
  • Identify what the creators of accounts, narratives, or maps have determined to be significant (significance)
  • Using appropriate protocols, interpret a variety of sources, including local stories or oral traditions, and Indigenous ways of knowing (holistic, experiential, reflective, and relational experiences, and memory) to contextualize different events in the past and present (evidence)
  • Characterize different time periods in history, including examples of progress and decline, and identify key turning points that marked periods of change (continuity and change)
  • Assess the long- and short-term causes and consequences, and the intended and unintended consequences, of an action, event, decision, or development (cause and consequence)
  • Assess the connectedness or the reciprocal relationship between people and place (cause and consequence)
  • Explain different perspectives on past and present people, places, issues, or events, and distinguish between worldviews of today and the past (perspective)
  • Explain and infer perspectives and sense of place, and compare varying perspectives on land and place (perspective)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about actions in the past and present, and assess appropriate ways to remember, reconcile, or respond (ethical judgment) 
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Key skills:
      • Draw conclusions about a problem, an issue, or a topic.
      • Assess and defend a variety of positions on a problem, an issue, or a topic.
      • Demonstrate leadership by planning, implementing, and assessing strategies to address a problem or an issue.
      • Identify and clarify a problem or issue.
      • Evaluate and organize collected data (e.g., in outlines, summaries, notes, timelines, charts).
      • Interpret information and data from a variety of maps, graphs, and tables.
      • Interpret and present data in a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, and graphic).
      • Accurately cite sources.
      • Construct graphs, tables, and maps to communicate ideas and information, demonstrating appropriate use of grids, scales, legends, and contours.
  • Assess the significance of people, events, places, issues, or developments in the past and present:
    • Key questions:
      • What factors can cause people, events, places, issues, or developments to become more or less significant?
      • What factors can make people, events, places, issues, or developments significant to different people?
      • What criteria should be used to assess the significance of people, events, places, issues, or developments?
    • Sample activities:
      • Use criteria to rank the most important people, events, places, issues, or developments in the current unit of study.
      • Compare how different groups assess the significance of people, events, places, issues, or developments.
  • protocols: Local First Peoples may have established protocols which are required for seeking permission for and guiding the use of First Peoples oral traditions and knowledge.
  • Characterize different time periods in history, including examples of progress and decline, and identify key turning points that marked periods of change:
    • Key questions:
      • What factors lead to changes or continuities affecting groups of people differently?
      • How do gradual processes and more sudden rates of change affect people living through them? Which method of change has more of an effect on society?
      • How are periods of change or continuity perceived by the people living through them? How does this compare to how they are perceived after the fact?
    • Sample activity:
      • Compare how different groups benefited or suffered as a result of a particular change.
  • Assess the long- and short-term causes and consequences, and the intended and unintended consequences, of an action, event, decision, or development:
    • Key questions:
      • What is the role of chance in particular actions, events, decisions, or developments?
      • Are there events with positive long-term consequences but negative short-term consequences, or vice versa?
    • Sample activities:
      • Assess whether the results of a particular action were intended or unintended consequences.
      • Evaluate the most important causes or consequences of various actions, events, decisions, or developments.
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about actions in the past and present, and assess appropriate ways to remember, reconcile, or respond:
    • Key questions:
      • What is the difference between implicit and explicit values?
      • Why should we consider the historical, political, and social context when making ethical judgments?
      • Should people of today have any responsibility for actions taken in the past?
      • Can people of the past be celebrated for great achievements if they have also done things considered unethical today? 
    • Sample activities:
      • Assess the responsibility of historical figures for an important event. Assess how much responsibility should be assigned to different people, and evaluate whether their actions were justified given the historical context.
      • Examine various media sources on a topic and assess how much of the language contains implicit and explicit moral judgments.
Concepts and Content: 
  • traditional territories of the B.C. First Nations and relationships with the land
  • role of oral tradition for B.C. First Peoples
  • impact of historical exchanges of ideas, practices, and materials among local B.C. First Peoples and with non-indigenous peoples
  • provincial and federal government policies and practices that have affected, and continue to affect, the responses of B.C. First Peoples to colonialism
  • resistance of B.C. First Peoples to colonialism
  • role and significance of media in challenging and supporting the continuity of culture, language, and self-determination of B.C. First Peoples
  • commonalities and differences between governance systems of traditional and contemporary B.C. First Peoples
  • contemporary challenges facing B.C. First Peoples, including legacies of colonialism
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • traditional territories of the B.C. First Nations and relationships with the land:
    • Sample topics:
      • traditional territories of local First Nations
      • Traditional territories may overlap.
      • difference between political boundaries and traditional territories
      • how the land shapes and influences First Peoples worldview (e.g., stewardship, cultural practices of the land, relationship to language)
      • cultural and linguistic diversity that exists among B.C. First Peoples
  • role of oral tradition for B.C. First Peoples:
    • Sample topics:
      • Elders as knowledge keepers who share the history of their people and lands
      • oral tradition as valid and legal evidence (e.g., Delgamuukw v. B.C., 1997; ownership of property, territory, and political agreements)
      • stories, songs, music, and dance as forms of narrative
      • Oral tradition shapes identity and connects to the past, present, and future.
      • Oral tradition provides guiding principles for living.
      • indigenous concept of time (e.g., spiralling versus linear)
  • impact of historical exchanges of ideas, practices, and materials among local B.C. First Peoples and with non-indigenous peoples:
    • Sample topics:
      • trade networks and routes
      • settlement and migration patterns
      • maritime and land fur trade
      • exchange of goods, technology, economy, knowledge
      • industries (e.g., gold rush, whaling)
  • provincial and federal government policies and practices that have affected, and continue to affect, the responses of B.C. First Peoples to colonialism:
    • Sample topics:
      • Indian Act and its amendments
      • enfranchisement
      • White Paper, Red Paper (Alberta), Brown Paper (B.C.)
      • residential schools, including federal apology, Truth and Reconciliation Commission and Report
      • treaties, including fishing and hunting rights
      • Sixties Scoop and foster care system
      • Canada’s constitution (e.g., Meech Lake and Charlottetown Accords, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms)
      • UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
  • resistance of B.C. First Peoples to colonialism:
    • Sample topics:
      • political actions of local and provincial indigenous groups (e.g., Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs, Métis Nation British Columbia)
      • Tsilhqot'in War
      • Gustafsen Lake
      • Idle No More
      • Judicial cases (e.g., Calder, 1973; Guerin, 1984; Sparrow, 1990; Van der Peet, 1996)
      • Cindy Blackstock and the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ruling
      • ecological justice and protests (e.g., pipelines, logging, hydraulic fracturing, liquefied natural gas, hydroelectricity)
  • role and significance of media in challenging and supporting the continuity of culture, language, and self-determination of B.C. First Peoples:
    • Sample topics:
      • portrayal and representation of First Peoples in media
      • repatriation and ownership of cultural objects
      • ethics of copyright, patent rights, intellectual property, and appropriation
  • commonalities and differences between governance systems of traditional and contemporary B.C. First Peoples:
    • Sample topics:
      • traditional governance
      • band system
      • land claims and self-governance
  • contemporary challenges facing B.C. First Peoples, including legacies of colonialism:
    • Sample topics:
      • missing and murdered women
      • stereotypes and institutionalized racism
      • intergenerational trauma
      • judicial and correctional system
      • child welfare system
      • conditions on reserves (e.g., water, housing, education)
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
Les identités, les visions du monde et les langues des peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique sont renouvelées, maintenues et transformées par leurs liens avec la terre.
L’impact du colonialisme et du contact avec les colons continue d’affecter la vie des peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique sur les plans politique, social et économique.
Les expressions culturelles communiquent la richesse, la diversité et la résilience des peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique.
Grâce à l’autonomie gouvernementale, à l’initiative et à l’autodétermination, les peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique défient le colonialisme toujours présent au Canada et y résistent.
 
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les démarches d’investigation liées à l’étude des sciences humaines et sociales pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées; et communiquer ses résultats et ses conclusions
  • Déterminer l’importance que peuvent revêtir les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses, et comparer divers points de vue en la matière selon les lieux, les époques et les groupes (portée)
  • Relever ce que les créateurs de récits, d’histoires ou de cartes ont établi historiquement comme étant des faits notables (portée)
  • Au moyen de protocoles adéquats, interpréter diverses sources, notamment des histoires locales ou des récits de tradition orale, et les méthodes autochtones d’acquisition du savoir (holistiques, expérientielles, réflectives et relationnelles, mémoire) pour contextualiser différents événements du passé et du présent (preuves)
  • Caractériser différentes ères historiques, notamment par des exemples de progrès et de déclin, et identifier les tournants décisifs ayant marqué des périodes de changement (continuité et changement)
  • Déterminer les causes et les conséquences, à court et à long terme, ainsi que les effets prévus ou imprévus d’une action, d’un événement, d’une décision ou du cours des choses (cause et conséquence)
  • Évaluer les relations d’interdépendance ou de réciprocité entre les personnes et les lieux (cause et conséquence)
  • Expliquer différents points de vue sur les personnes, les lieux, les enjeux et les événements du passé et du présent, et faire la distinction entre les visions du monde d’aujourd’hui et celles du passé
  • Expliquer différentes perspectives et diverses manifestations du sentiment d’appartenance, comparer les points de vue variés sur la terre et le milieu, et en tirer des conséquences (perspective)
  • Porter des jugements éthiques raisonnés sur des actions du passé et du présent, et déterminer des façons adéquates de les évoquer et d’y réagir, et de se réconcilier (jugement éthique)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les démarches d’investigation liées à l’étude des sciences humaines et sociales pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées; et communiquer ses résultats et ses conclusions:
    • Compétences clés :
      • Tirer des conclusions sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • Évaluer et défendre divers points de vue sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • Faire preuve d’initiative en planifiant, en adoptant et en évaluant des stratégies pour aborder un problème ou un enjeu
      • Relever et clarifier un problème ou un enjeu
      • Évaluer et organiser les données recueillies (p. ex. à partir de plans, de sommaires, de notes, de schémas chronologiques, de tableaux)
      • Interpréter l’information et les données provenant de cartes, graphiques et tableaux divers
      • Interpréter et présenter de l’information ou des données sous diverses formes (p. ex. orale, écrite et graphique)
      • Citer ses sources avec exactitude
      • Préparer des graphiques, des tableaux et des cartes pour communiquer des idées et de l’information, en démontrant un usage approprié des grilles, des échelles, des légendes et des courbes
  • Déterminer l’importance que peuvent revêtir les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses, et comparer divers points de vue en la matière selon les lieux, les époques et les groupes:
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels sont les facteurs qui font en sorte que les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses revêtent une importance plus ou moins grande?
      • Quels facteurs déterminent l’importance que diverses personnes accordent aux autres, aux lieux, aux événements ou au cours des choses?
      • Quels critères devrait-on appliquer pour évaluer l’importance des personnes, des lieux, des événements et du cours des choses?
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • Utiliser des critères pour attribuer différents degrés d’importance aux personnes, aux lieux, aux événements et au cours des choses dans le cadre de l’unité d’apprentissage actuelle
      • Comparer la façon dont divers groupes évaluent l’importance des personnes, des lieux, des événements ou du cours des choses
  • protocoles : Les peuples autochtones locaux peuvent disposer de protocoles à observer pour demander la permission d’utiliser leurs traditions orales et leur savoir, et pour en guider l’utilisation
  • Caractériser différentes ères historiques, notamment par des exemples de progrès et de déclin, et identifier les tournants décisifs ayant marqué des périodes de changement (continuité et changement) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels facteurs mènent à des situations de continuité ou de changement qui affectent différemment divers groupes?
      • Comment les processus graduels et les changements plus soudains affectent-ils les personnes qui les vivent? Quel processus de changement exerce plus d’effet sur la société?
      • Comment perçoit-on les périodes de continuité ou de changement lorsqu’on les vit par opposition à après coup?
    • Exemple d’activités :
      • Comparer la façon dont différents groupes ont profité d’un changement particulier ou en ont été éprouvés
  • Déterminer les causes et les conséquences, à court et à long terme, ainsi que les effets prévus ou imprévus d’une action, d’un événement, d’une décision ou du cours des choses (cause et conséquence) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quel rôle le hasard joue-t-il dans les événements, les décisions et le cours des choses?
      • Existe-t-il des événements qui ont des retombées à long terme positives mais des conséquences immédiates négatives, ou vice versa?
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • Déterminer si les résultats d’une action donnée relèvent d’une conséquence intentionnelle ou non
      • Évaluer les causes ou les conséquences les plus importantes de divers événements, décisions ou cours des choses
  • Porter des jugements éthiques raisonnés sur des actions du passé et du présent, et déterminer des façons adéquates de les évoquer et d’y réagir, et de se réconcilier (jugement éthique) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelle est la différence entre valeurs implicites et valeurs explicites?
      • Pourquoi devrait-on tenir compte du contexte historique, politique et social lorsque l’on porte des jugements éthiques?
      • Doit-on aujourd’hui assumer la responsabilité des actions du passé?
      • Doit-on célébrer les personnages historiques pour leurs réalisations s’ils ont aussi posé des gestes aujourd’hui considérés comme étant contraires à l’éthique?
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • Évaluer la responsabilité de personnages historiques face à un événement important. Évaluer quel degré de responsabilité doit être attribué à différentes personnes et déterminer si leurs actions étaient bien fondées dans un contexte historique donné
      • Étudier diverses sources médiatiques sur un enjeu et évaluer jusqu’à quel point le langage employé contient des jugements moraux implicites ou explicites
content_fr: 
  • Territoires traditionnels des Premières Nations de la Colombie-Britannique et liens avec la terre
  • Rôle des traditions orales pour les peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique
  • Impact des échanges historiques d’idées, de pratiques et de matériel au sein des différents peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique et entre ceux-ci et les peuples non autochtones
  • Politiques et pratiques provinciales et fédérales qui ont affecté et qui affectent les réactions des peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique face au colonialisme
  • Résistance au colonialisme des peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique
  • Rôle et portée des médias pour remettre en question ou appuyer la continuité de la culture, des langues et de l’autodétermination des peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique
  • Points communs et divergences entre systèmes de gouvernance traditionnels et contemporains des peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique
  • Défis contemporains auxquels les peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique sont confrontés, y compris l’héritage du colonialisme
content elaborations fr: 
  • Territoires traditionnels des Premières Nations de la Colombie-Britannique et liens avec la terre :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • territoires traditionnels des Premières Nations locales
      • chevauchement possible des territoires traditionnels
      • différences entre frontières politiques et territoires traditionnels
      • l’influence de la terre sur la vision du monde des peuples autochtones (intendance, pratiques culturelles en lien avec la terre, liens avec la langue, etc.)
      • diversité culturelle et linguistique parmi les peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique
  • Rôle des traditions orales pour les peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les aînés comme gardiens du savoir, diffusant l’histoire de leur peuple et de leurs terres
      • la tradition orale en tant que témoignage valide et légal (affaire Delgamuukw c. C.-B., 1997; propriété de biens, territoire et ententes politiques, etc.)
      • récits, chants, musique et danse comme façons de raconter
      • la tradition orale influençant l’identité et faisant le pont entre passé, présent et avenir
      • la tradition orale comme source de principes directeurs vitaux
      • concept autochtone du temps (spirale vs linéaire, etc.)
  • Impact des échanges historiques d’idées, de pratiques et de matériel au sein des différents peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique et entre ceux-ci et les peuples non autochtones :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • réseaux et itinéraires commerciaux
      • établissements et habitudes migratoires
      • traite des fourrures en mer et sur terre
      • échange de biens, technologie, économie, connaissances
      • industries (p. ex. ruées vers l’or, pêche à la baleine, etc.)
  • Politiques et pratiques provinciales et fédérales qui ont affecté et qui affectent les réactions des peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique face au colonialisme :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • Loi sur les Indiens et ses modifications
      • émancipation
      • Livre blanc, Livre rouge (Alberta), Livre brun (Colombie-Britannique)
      • pensionnats, excuses du gouvernement fédéral, Commission de vérité et de réconciliation et rapport de la Commission
      • traités, notamment sur les droits de chasse et de pêche
      • rafle des années soixante et système des familles d’accueil
      • Constitution canadienne (Accord du lac Meech et Accord de Charlottetown, Charte canadienne des droits et libertés, etc.)
      • Déclaration des Nations Unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones
  • Résistance au colonialisme des peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • actions politiques de groupes autochtones locaux et provinciaux (Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs, Métis Nation British Columbia, etc.)
      • Guerre des Tsilhqot'in
      • Gustafsen Lake
      • mouvement Idle No More
      • poursuites (Calder, 1973; Guérin, 1984; Sparrow, 1990; Van der Peet, 1996, etc.)
      • Cindy Blackstock et la décision du Tribunal canadien des droits de la personne
      • justice écologique et manifestations connexes (pipelines, exploitation forestière, fracturation hydraulique, gaz naturel liquéfié, hydroélectricité)
  • Rôle et portée des médias pour remettre en question ou appuyer la continuité de la culture, des langues et de l’autodétermination des peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • évocation et représentation des peuples autochtones dans les médias
      • rapatriement et propriété d’objets culturels
      • éthique du droit d’auteur, de la propriété intellectuelle et de l’appropriation
  • Points communs et divergences entre systèmes de gouvernance traditionnels et contemporains des peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • gouvernance traditionnelle
      • système de bande
      • revendications territoriales et autonomie gouvernementale
  • Défis contemporains auxquels les peuples autochtones de la Colombie-Britannique sont confrontés, y compris l’héritage du colonialisme :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • femmes disparues et assassinées
      • stéréotypes et racisme institutionnalisé
      • traumatisme intergénérationnel
      • système judiciaire et correctionnel
      • système de protection de la jeunesse
      • conditions sur les réserves (p. ex. eau, logement, éducation)
PDF Only: 
Yes
Curriculum Status: 
2019/20
Has French Translation: 
Yes