Curriculum Human Geography Grade 12

Subject: 
Human Geography
Grade: 
Grade 12
Big Ideas: 
Analyzing data from a variety of sources allows us to better understand our globally connected world.
Demographic patterns and population distribution are influenced by physical features and natural resources.
Human activities alter landscapes in a variety of ways.
A geographic region can encompass a variety of physical features and/or human interactions. 
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use geographic inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze data and ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Assess the significance of places by identifying the physical and/or human features that characterize them (sense of place)
  • Assess a variety of interpretations of geographic evidence after investigating different perspectives, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence (evidence and interpretation)
  • Draw conclusions about the variation and distribution of geographic phenomena over time and space (patterns and trends)
  • Evaluate how particular geographic actions or events influence human practices or outcomes (geographical value judgments)
  • Evaluate features or aspects of geographic phenomena or locations to explain what makes them worthy of attention or recognition (geographical importance)
  • Identify and assess how human and environmental factors and events influence each other (interactions and associations)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about controversial actions in the past or present, and determine whether we have a responsibility to respond (geographical value judgments)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use geographic inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze data and ideas; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Sample topics:
      •  Map skills:
        • Use a map for navigation.
        • Understand a map legend.
        • Use map scales.
        • Understand latitude and longitude.
        • Understand topographic maps and contour lines.
      •  Mapping software and GIS tools
      •  Interpreting satellite images and photos
  • Assess a variety of interpretations of geographic evidence after investigating different perspectives, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence (evidence and interpretation):
    • Sample activities:
      •  Research a contentious geographic issue by examining different sides of the issue, comparing the evidence, and reaching a conclusion. The following are some possible issues to research:
        • buying local versus imported produce
        • environmental impact of living in cities versus living in rural areas
        • impact of climate change on northern regions versus equatorial regions
      •  Compare different versions of a world map and talk about what the differences mean (e.g., Mercator projection makes Africa and Greenland look the same size even though they aren’t).
  • Draw conclusions about the variation and distribution of geographic phenomena over time and space (patterns and trends):
    • Key questions:
      • What are some reasons that a company might move manufacturing of certain goods from one country to another?
      • Is resource use and development always harmful to the landscape?
      • How have our Canadian eating patterns changed over the last 100 years? Where did our food come from then? Where does it come from now? What do we eat now that we didn’t used to eat? Where does it come from?
    • Sample activities:
      • Research a specific product (e.g., toothbrush, basketball, avocado). Where is it grown/sourced, manufactured and then sold?
      • Find historical photos of the town you live in/were born in and compare them with how the town looks now. What changes happened and why?
      • Compare political systems in Canada with those in another country. What differences in values and beliefs might account for the very different ways countries govern themselves?
  • Evaluate features or aspects of geographic phenomena or locations to explain what makes them worthy of attention or recognition (geographical importance):
    • Key questions:
      • What key features do cities have? Why are so many people moving to cities?
      • Which farming methods are most sustainable?
      • Why is English the main language of business, academia, and the Internet around the world?
      • Why are so many human communities situated along coastlines?
    • Sample activities:
      • Explore a piece of music, a piece of art, or a story from somewhere else in the world, and describe the place it came from and the artist who created it. How does it reflect the place it came from?
      • Research the significance of key cultural places (e.g., the Vatican, the Taj Mahal, Saint Basil’s Cathedral, the Great Wall of China). Why are they significant and to whom?
Concepts and Content: 
  • demographic patterns of growth, decline, and movement
  • relationships between cultural traits, use of physical space, and impacts on the environment
  • relationship between First Peoples and the environment
  • global agricultural practices
  • industrialization, trade, and natural resource demands
  • factors behind increased urbanization and its influence on societies and environments
  • relationships between natural resources and patterns of population settlement and economic development
  • political organization of geographic regions
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
L’analyse de données provenant de diverses sources nous permet de mieux comprendre le monde branché dans lequel nous vivons.
Les tendances démographiques et la distribution des populations sont influencées par les entités physiques (topographie) et les ressources naturelles.
Les activités humaines modifient le paysage terrestre de diverses façons.
Une région géographique peut comprendre diverses entités physiques ou être le théâtre de diverses interactions humaines.
 
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les démarches d'investigation liées à l'étude de la géographie humaine pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées; et communiquer ses résultats et ses conclusions
  • Déterminer l'importance que peuvent revêtir les lieux en identifiant les entités physiques ou traits humains qui les caractérisent (notion d'espace)
  • Évaluer diverses interprétations de preuves géographiques après avoir étudié les points de divergence, la fiabilité des sources et le bien-fondé des preuves (preuves et interprétation)
  • Tirer des conclusions sur la variation et la distribution des phénomènes géographiques dans le temps et dans l'espace (modèles et tendances)
  • Déterminer comment des actions ou des événements donnés de nature géographique influent sur les pratiques humaines ou les résultats (jugements de valeur d'ordre géographiques)
  • Déterminer les caractéristiques ou aspects des phénomènes géographiques ou des lieux, afin d'expliquer ce qui les rend dignes d'attention ou de reconnaissance (portée géographique)
  • Relever et déterminer l'influence mutuelle des facteurs et des événements humains et environnementaux (interactions et associations)
  • Porter des jugements éthiques raisonnés sur des actions controversées du passé ou du présent, et déterminer si nous avons la responsabilité d'y réagir (jugements de valeur d'ordre géographique)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les démarches d'investigation liées à l'étude de la géographie humaine pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées; et communiquer ses résultats et ses conclusions :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • compétences cartographiques :
        • s'orienter au moyen d'une carte
        • comprendre les légendes sur une carte
        • utiliser les échelles des cartes
        • comprendre la latitude et la longitude
        • comprendre les cartes topographiques et les courbes de niveau
      • logiciels de cartographie et outils de SIG
      • interprétation d'images-satellites et de photos-satellites
  • Évaluer diverses interprétations de preuves géographiques après avoir étudié les points de divergence, la fiabilité des sources et le bien-fondé des preuves (preuves et interprétation) :
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Mener une recherche sur un enjeu géographique controversé en étudiant les différents aspects de la question, en comparant les preuves et en en arrivant à une conclusion. Voici quelques exemples d'une telle recherche :
        • achat de fruits et légumes frais locaux par rapport à importés
        • impact environnemental de la vie en ville vs la vie à la campagne
        • impact des changements climatiques sur les régions nordiques vs les régions équatoriales
      • Comparer différentes versions d'une carte du monde et discuter de ce que signifient les différences (p. ex. projection de Mercator selon laquelle l'Afrique et le Groenland semblent être des zones de même étendue, même si ce n'est pas le cas)
  • Tirer des conclusions sur la variation et la distribution des phénomènes géographiques dans le temps et dans l'espace (modèles et tendances) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelles raisons peuvent amener une entreprise à délocaliser la fabrication de certains biens d'un pays à l'autre?
      • L'utilisation et l'exploitation des ressources sont-elles toujours néfastes pour le paysage terrestre?
      • Comment les habitudes alimentaires des Canadiens ont-elles évolué depuis un siècle? D'où venait notre nourriture? D'où vient-elle aujourd'hui? Que mangeons-nous aujourd'hui de nouveau? D'où ces nouveaux aliments viennent-ils?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Mener des recherches sur un produit spécifique (p. ex. brosse à dents, balle de basketball, avocat). Où est-il produit/d'où provient-il, où est-il fabriqué, puis vendu?
      • Trouver des photos historiques de la ville que l'on habite/où l'on est né afin de les comparer avec l'apparence de ces lieux aujourd'hui. Quels changements sont survenus, et pourquoi?
      • Comparer les systèmes politiques au Canada avec ceux d'un autre pays. Quelles différences de valeurs et de croyances peuvent expliquer les modes de gouvernement très différents entre ces pays?
  • Déterminer les caractéristiques ou aspects des phénomènes géographiques ou des lieux, afin d'expliquer ce qui les rend dignes d'attention ou de reconnaissance (portée géographique) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels sont les principaux attributs des villes? Pourquoi sont-ils si attrayants pour tant de gens?
      • Quelles sont les pratiques agricoles les plus écoviables?
      • Pourquoi l'anglais est-il la principale langue des affaires, des milieux universitaires et des communications par Internet dans le monde?
      • Pourquoi tant de communautés humaines sont-elles situées le long des côtes?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Étudier une pièce musicale, une œuvre d'art ou une histoire venue de l'étranger, et décrire son origine physique et son auteur. Comment reflète-t-elle son origine physique?
      • Étudier l'importance des grands lieux culturels (p. ex. le Vatican, le Taj Mahal, la cathédrale Saint-Basile-le-Bienheureux de Moscou, la Grande Muraille de Chine). Pourquoi et pour qui ces lieux ont-ils de l'importance?
content_fr: 
  • Tendances démographiques dans la croissance, le déclin et les mouvements des populations
  • Relations entre caractéristiques culturelles, occupation de l'espace physique et impacts sur l'environnement
  • Relations entre peuples autochtones et environnement
  • Pratiques agricoles dans le monde
  • Industrialisation, commerce et demande de ressources naturelles
  • Facteurs qui sous-tendent l'urbanisation accrue et son influence sur les sociétés et les milieux
  • Relations entre ressources naturelles, tendances dans les établissements humains et développement économique
  • Organisation politique des régions géographiques
PDF Only: 
Yes
Curriculum Status: 
2019/20
Has French Translation: 
Yes