Curriculum Études des génocides 12e

Subject: 
Genocide Studies
Grade: 
Grade 12
Big Ideas: 
The intentional destruction of peoples and their cultures is not inevitable, and such attempts can be disrupted and resisted.
The use of the term “genocide” to describe atrocities has political, legal, social, and cultural ramifications.
Despite international commitments to prohibit genocide, violence targeted against groups of people has continued to challenge global peace and prosperity.
While genocides are caused by and carried out for different reasons, all genocides share similarities in progression and scope.
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Assess the significance of people, locations, events, or developments, and compare varying perspectives on their significance at particular times and places, and from group to group (significance)
  • Assess the credibility of, and the justification for the use of, evidence after investigating the reliability of sources and data, the adequacy of evidence, and the bias of accounts and claims (evidence)
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups at different times and places (continuity and change)
  • Assess how prevailing conditions and the actions of individuals or groups influence events, locations, decisions, or developments (cause and consequence)
  • Explain and infer different perspectives on past or present people, locations, issues, or events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about, and assess varying responses to, actions and events in the past or present (ethical judgment)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Key skills:
      • Draw conclusions about a problem, an issue, or a topic.
      • Assess and defend a variety of positions on a problem, an issue, or a topic.
      • Demonstrate leadership by planning, implementing, and assessing strategies to address a problem or an issue.
      • Identify and clarify a problem or issue.
      • Evaluate and organize collected data (e.g., in outlines, summaries, notes, timelines, charts).
      • Interpret information and data from a variety of maps, graphs, and tables.
      • Interpret and present data in a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, and graphic).
      • Accurately cite sources.
      • Construct graphs, tables, and maps to communicate ideas and information, demonstrating appropriate use of grids, scales, legends, and contours.
  • Assess the significance of people, locations, events, or developments, and compare varying perspectives on their significance at particular times and places, and from group to group:
    • Key questions:
      • What factors can cause people, locations, events, or developments to become more or less significant?
      • What factors can make people, locations, events, or developments significant to different people?
      • What criteria should be used to assess the significance of people, locations, events, or developments?
    • Sample activities:
      • Use criteria to rank the most important people, locations, events, or developments in the current unit of study.
      • Compare how different groups assess the significance of people, locations, events, or developments.
  • Assess the credibility of, and the justification for the use of, evidence after investigating the reliability of sources and data, the adequacy of evidence, and the bias of accounts and claims:
    • Key questions:
      • What criteria should be used to assess the reliability of a source?
      • How much evidence is sufficient in order to support a conclusion?
      • How much about various people, locations, events, or developments can be known and how much is unknowable?
    • Sample activities:
      • Compare and contrast multiple accounts of the same event and evaluate their usefulness as historical sources.
      • Examine what sources are available and what sources are missing and evaluate how the available evidence shapes your perspective on the people, locations, events, or developments studied.
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups at different times and places:
    • Key questions:
      • What factors lead to changes or continuities affecting groups of people differently?
      • How do gradual processes and more sudden rates of change affect people living through them? Which method of change has more of an effect on society?
      • How are periods of change or continuity perceived by the people living through them? How does this compare to how they are perceived after the fact?
    • Sample activity:
      • Compare how different groups benefited or suffered as a result of a particular change.
  • Assess how prevailing conditions and the actions of individuals or groups influence events, locations, decisions, or developments:
    • Key questions:
      • What is the role of chance in particular events, decisions, or developments?
      • Are there events with positive long-term consequences but negative short-term consequences, or vice versa?
    • Sample activities:
      • Assess whether the results of a particular action were intended or unintended consequences.
      • Evaluate the most important causes or consequences of various events, decisions, or developments.
  • Explain and infer different perspectives on past or present people, locations, issues, or events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs:
    • Key questions:
      • What sources of information can people today use to try to understand what people in different times and places believed?
      • How much can we generalize about values and beliefs in a given society or time period?
      • Is it fair to judge people of the past using modern values?
    • Sample activity:
      • Explain how the beliefs of people on different sides of the same issue influence their opinions. 
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about, and assess varying responses to, actions and events in the past or present:
    • Key questions:
      • What is the difference between implicit and explicit values?
      • Why should we consider the historical, political, and social context when making ethical judgments?
      • Should people of today have any responsibility for actions taken in the past?
      • Can people of the past be celebrated for great achievements if they have also done things considered unethical today? 
    • Sample activities:
      • Assess the responsibility of historical figures for an important event. Assess how much responsibility should be assigned to different people, and evaluate whether their actions were justified given the historical context.
      • Examine various media sources on a topic and assess how much of the language contains implicit and explicit moral judgments.
Concepts and Content: 
  • origins and development of the term “genocide”
  • economic, political, social, and cultural conditions of genocide
  • characteristics and stages of genocide
  • acts of mass violence and atrocities in different global regions
  • strategies used to commit genocide
  • use of technology in promoting and carrying out genocide
  • recognition of and responses to genocides
  • movements that deny the existence of or minimize the scope of genocides
  • evidence used to demonstrate the scale and nature of genocides
  • genocide prevention, including international law and enforcement
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • economic, political, social, and cultural conditions of genocide:
    • Sample topics:
      • perpetrators: regimes and leaders
      • demographics: vulnerable minorities
      • heroes, bystanders, perpetrators
    • Key questions:
      • What were the underlying social (or economic or cultural or political) conditions in Germany that led to the Holocaust?
      • What was the role of individuals within the Khmer Rouge in determining the events of the genocide in Cambodia? 
      • Are all Khmer Rouge leaders equally significant in causing the genocide?
  • characteristics and stages of genocide:
    • Sample topic:
      • eight stages of genocide:
        • classification
        • symbolization
        • dehumanization
        • organization
        • polarization
        • preparation
        • extermination
        • denial
    • Key questions:
      • How do the stages of genocide affect different people in the areas in which genocides occur? 
      • How do people’s lives change depending on who and where they are? In what ways might they remain the same?
  • acts of mass violence and atrocities in different global regions:
    • Sample topics:
      • indigenous peoples and cultures
      • Beothuk extinction
      • Armenian genocide
      • anti-Semitic pogroms
      • Soviet Union and Ukraine (Holodomor famine)
      • Japanese occupation of Korea and China
      • the Holocaust
      • Khmer Rouge in Cambodia
      • Rwanda
      • Sudan
      • Guatemala
      • Yugoslavia
  • strategies used to commit genocide:
    • Sample topics:
      • rape
      • stereotyping and propaganda
      • social pressure
      • dehumanization
      • organized violence
      • polarization
      • denial of rights
      • starvation
      • extermination
  • recognition of and responses to genocides:
    • Sample topics:
      • recognition and responses (e.g., apologies, reparations, redress, reconciliation, memorialization)
      • human rights tribunals
      • war crime trials
      • international intervention
      • memorials and museums
    • Key questions:
      • What are some examples of appropriate demonstrations of recognition and responses to genocide? 
      • What are some examples of inappropriate responses? 
      • Why do some forms of recognition and response fall short?
  • movements that deny the existence of or minimize the scope of genocides:
    • Sample topics:
      • reasons why people deny the existence of genocides
      • methods used to cast doubt on evidence for genocides
    • Key question:
      • What questions can we ask of the evidence used by genocide denial groups to assess the credibility of the sources and recognize the bias in these sources?
  • evidence used to demonstrate the scale and nature of genocides:
    • Sample topics:
      • forensics and testimonies
      • mass graves and human remains
      • survival stories
    • Key questions:
      • What kinds of evidence can we use to prove genocide, and how do we justify which pieces of evidence we use? 
      • At what point do we consider our evidence to be adequate?
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
La destruction intentionnelle des peuples et de leurs cultures n’est pas inévitable, et l’on peut faire obstacle à de telles tentatives et y résister.
L’utilisation du terme « génocide » pour décrire de telles atrocités a des ramifications politiques, juridiques, sociales et culturelles.
Malgré les engagements de la communauté internationale pour empêcher les génocides, la violence ciblant certains groupes de personnes continue d’être un défi à la paix et à la prospérité dans le monde.
Causés et menés pour différentes raisons, tous les génocides ont cependant en commun certains traits liés à leur progression et à leur portée.
 
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les démarches d'investigation liées à l'étude des sciences humaines et sociales pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées; et communiquer ses résultats et ses conclusions
  • Déterminer l'importance que peuvent revêtir les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses, et comparer divers points de vue en la matière selon les lieux, les époques et les groupes (portée)
  • Évaluer la crédibilité des preuves et ce qui sous-tend leur utilisation après avoir étudié la fiabilité des sources et des données, le bien-fondé des preuves, et les partis pris qui peuvent influencer les récits et les affirmations (preuves)
  • Comparer et opposer les éléments de continuité et de changement selon les groupes, les lieux et les époques (continuité et changement)
  • Évaluer dans quelle mesure la conjoncture et les actions individuelles ou collectives influent sur les événements, les lieux, les décisions ou le cours des choses (cause et conséquence)
  • Expliquer différents points de vue au sujet de personnes, de lieux, d'enjeux ou d'événements du passé ou du présent, en tenant compte des normes, des valeurs, des visions du monde et des croyances dominantes, et en tirer des conclusions (perspective)
  • Porter des jugements éthiques raisonnés sur des actions du passé et du présent, et déterminer les diverses façons d'y réagir (jugement éthique)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les démarches d'investigation liées à l'étude des sciences humaines et sociales pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées; et communiquer ses résultats et ses conclusions :
    • Compétences clés :
      • Tirer des conclusions sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • Évaluer et défendre divers points de vue sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • Faire preuve d'initiative en planifiant, en adoptant et en évaluant des stratégies pour aborder un problème ou un enjeu
      • Relever et clarifier un problème ou un enjeu
      • Évaluer et organiser les données recueillies (p. ex. à partir de plans, de sommaires, de notes, de schémas chronologiques, de tableaux)
      • Interpréter l'information et les données provenant de cartes, graphiques et tableaux divers
      • Interpréter et présenter de l'information ou des données sous diverses formes (p. ex. orale, écrite et graphique)
      • Citer ses sources avec exactitude
      • Préparer des graphiques, des tableaux et des cartes pour communiquer des idées et de l'information, en démontrant un usage approprié des grilles, des échelles, des légendes et des courbes
  • Déterminer l'importance que peuvent revêtir les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses, et comparer divers points de vue en la matière selon les lieux, les époques et les groupes (portée) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels sont les facteurs qui font en sorte que les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses revêtent une importance plus ou moins grande?
      • Quels facteurs déterminent l'importance que diverses personnes accordent aux autres, aux lieux, aux événements ou au cours des choses?
      • Quels critères devrait-on appliquer pour évaluer l'importance des personnes, des lieux, des événements et du cours des choses?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Utiliser des critères pour attribuer différents degrés d'importance aux personnes, aux lieux, aux événements et au cours des choses dans le cadre de l'unité d'apprentissage actuelle
      • Comparer la façon dont divers groupes évaluent l'importance des personnes, des lieux, des événements ou du cours des choses
  • Évaluer la crédibilité des preuves et ce qui sous-tend leur utilisation après avoir étudié la fiabilité des sources et des données, le bien-fondé des preuves, et les partis pris qui peuvent influencer les récits et les affirmations (preuves) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels critères devrait-on appliquer pour évaluer la fiabilité d'une source?
      • Combien de preuves sont suffisantes pour étayer une conclusion?
      • Quelle part des personnes, des lieux, des événements et du cours des choses peut-on connaître et quelle part est-il impossible de connaître?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Comparer et contraster les comptes rendus multiples d'un même événement et évaluer leur utilité à titre de sources historiques
      • Déterminer quelles sont les sources accessibles et les sources manquantes, et l'influence des preuves disponibles sur le point de vue que nous avons sur les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses à l'étude
  • Comparer et opposer les éléments de continuité et de changement selon les groupes, les lieux et les époques (continuité et changement) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels facteurs mènent à des situations de continuité ou de changement qui affectent différemment divers groupes?
      • Comment les processus graduels et les changements plus soudains affectent-ils les personnes qui les vivent? Quel processus de changement exerce plus d'effet sur la société?
      • Comment perçoit-on les périodes de continuité ou de changement lorsqu'on les vit par opposition à après coup?
    • Exemple d'activités :
      • Comparer la façon dont différents groupes ont profité d'un changement particulier ou en ont été éprouvés
  • Évaluer dans quelle mesure la conjoncture et les actions individuelles ou collectives influent sur les événements, les lieux, les décisions ou le cours des choses (cause et conséquence) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quel rôle le hasard joue-t-il dans les événements, les décisions ou le cours des choses?
      • Certains événements ont-ils des retombées à long terme positives mais des conséquences immédiates négatives, ou vice versa?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Déterminer si les résultats d'une action donnée relèvent d'une conséquence intentionnelle ou non
      • Évaluer les causes ou les conséquences les plus importantes de divers événements, décisions ou cours des choses
  • Expliquer différents points de vue au sujet de personnes, de lieux, d'enjeux ou d'événements du passé ou du présent, en tenant compte des normes, des valeurs, des visions du monde et des croyances dominantes, et en tirer des conclusions (perspective) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelles sources d'information peut-on aujourd'hui utiliser pour essayer de comprendre ce que croyaient les gens de diverses époques et divers lieux?
      • Jusqu'à quel point peut-on généraliser les valeurs et les croyances d'une société ou d'une époque données?
      • Est-il équitable de juger les acteurs de l'histoire en utilisant des valeurs modernes?
    • Exemple d'activités :
      • Expliquer comment des personnes qui divergent d'opinion sur un même enjeu peuvent être influencées par leurs croyances
  • Porter des jugements éthiques raisonnés sur des actions du passé et du présent, et déterminer les diverses façons d'y réagir (jugement éthique) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelle est la différence entre valeurs implicites et valeurs explicites?
      • Pourquoi devrait-on tenir compte du contexte historique, politique et social lorsque l'on porte des jugements éthiques?
      • Doit-on aujourd'hui assumer la responsabilité pour les actions du passé?
      • Doit-on célébrer les personnages historiques pour leurs réalisations s'ils ont aussi posé des gestes aujourd'hui considérés comme étant contraires à l'éthique?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Évaluer la responsabilité de personnages historiques face à un événement important. Évaluer quel degré de responsabilité doit être attribué à différentes personnes et déterminer si leurs actions étaient bien fondées dans un contexte historique donné
      • Étudier diverses sources médiatiques sur un enjeu et évaluer jusqu'à quel point le langage contient des jugements moraux implicites ou explicites
content_fr: 
  • Origines et évolution du terme « génocide »
  • Conditions économiques, politiques, sociales et culturelles du génocide
  • Caractéristiques et stades du génocide
  • Actes de violence massive et atrocités dans différentes régions du monde
  • Stratégies utilisées pour commettre un génocide
  • Utilisation de la technologie pour promouvoir et perpétrer un génocide
  • Reconnaissance des génocides et réactions
  • Mouvements négationnistes ou qui minimisent l'étendue des génocides
  • Preuves utilisées pour démontrer l'ampleur et la nature des génocides
  • Prévention des génocides, notamment par le droit international et l'application des lois
content elaborations fr: 
  • Conditions économiques, politiques, sociales et culturelles du génocide :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • auteurs de ces crimes : régimes et dirigeants
      • démographie : minorités vulnérables
      • héros, témoins silencieux, auteurs des crimes
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelles conditions sociales (ou économiques, culturelles ou politiques) sous-jacentes en Allemagne ont-elles mené à l'Holocauste?
      • Quel rôle les individus ont-ils joué au sein des Khmers rouges dans la suite des événements ayant mené au génocide au Cambodge?
      • Les dirigeants des Khmers rouges ont-ils tous joué un rôle aussi important dans ce génocide?
  • Caractéristiques et stades du génocide :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les huit (8) stades des génocides :
        • classification
        • symbolisation
        • déshumanisation
        • organisation
        • polarisation
        • préparation
        • extermination
        • déni
      • Questions clés :
        • Comment les stades du génocide affectent-ils différentes personnes dans les régions où il a lieu?
        • Comment la vie des gens change-t-elle dépendamment de qui ils sont et du lieu où ils se trouvent? Comment peuvent-ils rester les mêmes?
  • Actes de violence massive et atrocités dans différentes régions du monde :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • peuples et cultures autochtones
      • extinction des Beothuk
      • génocide arménien
      • pogroms antisémites
      • Union soviétique et Ukraine (famine de l'Holodomor)
      • occupation japonaise de la Corée et de la Chine
      • l'Holocauste
      • les Khmers rouges au Cambodge
      • Rwanda
      • Soudan
      • Guatemala
      • Yougoslavie
  • Stratégies utilisées pour commettre un génocide :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • viol
      • stéréotypes et propagande
      • pression sociale
      • déshumanisation
      • violence organisée
      • polarisation
      • déni des droits
      • famine
      • extermination
  • Reconnaissance des génocides et réactions :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • reconnaissance et réaction (p. ex. excuses, réparations, dédommagement, réconciliation, commémoration)
      • tribunaux des droits de la personne
      • procès pour crimes de guerre
      • intervention internationale
      • monuments commémoratifs et musées
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels exemples peut-on donner de démonstrations adéquates de la reconnaissance du génocide et de réaction à cet acte?
      • Quels exemples peut-on donner de réactions inadéquates?
      • Pourquoi certaines formes de reconnaissance et de réaction sont-elles insuffisantes?
  • Mouvements négationnistes ou qui minimisent l'étendue des génocides :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • raisons pour lesquelles des gens nient l'existence de génocides
      • moyens utilisés pour mettre en doute les preuves sur les génocides
    • Question clé :
      • Quelles questions pouvons-nous poser quant aux preuves alléguées par les négationnistes afin d'évaluer la crédibilité de leurs sources et de mettre au jour la partialité de celles-ci?
  • Preuves utilisées pour démontrer l'ampleur et la nature des génocides :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • preuves médico-légales et témoignages
      • charniers et restes humains
      • récits de survivants
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels types de preuves peut-on utiliser pour prouver l'existence d'un génocide et comment peut-on justifier ces preuves?
      • À quel moment peut-on considérer les preuves comme étant adéquates?
PDF Only: 
Yes
Curriculum Status: 
2019/20
Has French Translation: 
Yes