Curriculum Études autochtones contemporaines 12e

Subject: 
Contemporary Indigenous Studies
Grade: 
Grade 12
Big Ideas: 
The identities, worldviews, and languages of indigenous peoples are renewed, sustained, and transformed through their connection to the land.
Indigenous peoples are reclaiming mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual well-being despite the continuing effects of colonialism.
Indigenous peoples continue to advocate and assert rights to self-determination.
Reconciliation requires all colonial societies to work together to foster healing and address injustices.
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; listen to the oral tradition of Elders and other local knowledge holders; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Use indigenous principles of learning (holistic, experiential, reflective, and relational) to better understand connectedness and the reciprocal relationship of First Peoples to the land
  • Assess and compare the significance of the interconnections between people, places, events, and developments at a particular time and place, and determine what they reveal about issues in the past and present (significance)
  • Using appropriate protocols, ask questions and corroborate inferences of Elders and other local knowledge keepers through oral traditions, indigenous knowledge, memory, history, and story (evidence)
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups in different time periods and places (continuity and change)
  • Assess how underlying conditions and the actions of individuals or groups affect events, decisions, and developments, and analyze multiple consequences (cause and consequence)
  • Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, and events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective)
  • Make reasoned ethical claims about actions in the past and present after considering the context and values of the times (ethical judgment)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; listen to the oral tradition of Elders and other local knowledge holders; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Key skills:
      • Draw conclusions about a problem, an issue, or a topic.
      • Assess and defend a variety of positions on a problem, an issue, or a topic.
      • Demonstrate leadership by planning, implementing, and assessing strategies to address a problem or an issue.
      • Identify and clarify a problem or issue.
      • Evaluate and organize collected data (e.g., in outlines, summaries, notes, timelines, charts).
      • Interpret information and data from a variety of maps, graphs, and tables.
      • Interpret and present data in a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, and graphic).
      • Accurately cite sources.
      • Construct graphs, tables, and maps to communicate ideas and information, demonstrating appropriate use of grids, scales, legends, and contours.
  • protocols : Local First Peoples may have established protocols which are required for seeking permission for and guiding the use of First Peoples oral traditions and knowledge.
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups in different time periods and places (continuity and change):
    • Key questions:
      • What factors lead to changes or continuities affecting groups of people differently?
      • How do gradual processes and more sudden rates of change affect people living through them? Which method of change has more of an effect on society?
      • How are periods of change or continuity perceived by the people living through them? How does this compare to how they are perceived after the fact?
    • Sample activity:
      • Compare how different groups benefited or suffered as a result of a particular change.
  • Assess how underlying conditions and the actions of individuals or groups affect events, decisions, and developments, and analyze multiple consequences (cause and consequence):
    • Key questions:
      • What is the role of chance in particular events, decisions, and developments?
      • Are there events with positive long-term consequences but negative short-term consequences, or vice versa?
    • Sample activities:
      • Assess whether the results of a particular action were intended or unintended consequences.
      • Evaluate the most important causes or consequences of various events, decisions, and developments.
  • Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, and events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective):
    • Key questions:
      • What sources of information can people today use to try to understand what people in different times and places believed?
      • How much can we generalize about values and beliefs in a given society or time period?
      • Is it fair to judge people of the past using modern values?
    • Sample activity:
      • Explain how the beliefs of people on different sides of the same issue influence their opinions. 
  • Make reasoned ethical claims about actions in the past and present after considering the context and values of the times (ethical judgment): 
    • Key questions:
      • What is the difference between implicit and explicit values?
      • Why should we consider the historical, political, and social context when making ethical judgments?
      • Should people of today have any responsibility for actions taken in the past?
      • Can people of the past be celebrated for great achievements if they have also done things considered unethical today? 
    • Sample activities:
      • Assess the responsibility of historical figures for an important event. Assess how much responsibility should be assigned to different people, and evaluate whether their actions were justified given the historical context.
      • Examine various media sources on a topic and assess how much of the language contains implicit and explicit moral judgments.
Concepts and Content: 
  • varied identities and worldviews of indigenous peoples, and the importance of the interconnection of family, relationships, language, culture, and the land
  • factors that sustain and challenge the identities and worldviews of indigenous peoples
  • resilience and survival of indigenous peoples in the face of colonialism
  • community development, partnerships, and control of economic opportunities
  • responses to inequities in the relationships of indigenous peoples with governments in Canada and around the world
  • restoring balance through truth, healing, and reconciliation in Canada and around the world
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • varied identities and worldviews of indigenous peoples, and the importance of the interconnection of family, relationships, language, culture, and the land:
    • Sample topics:
      • Members of different cultures have different worldviews as a result of their beliefs, values, practices, and experiences.
      • connections to the land as expressed in language, culture, values, and practices
      • relationships among family, Elders, and community
      • Being a member of a community helps shape a person’s identity.
      • Roles, responsibilities, and experiences as a member of one or more cultural groups shape a person’s identity. 
      • concepts of respect, reciprocity, relevance, responsibility, and resilience
  • factors that sustain and challenge the identities and worldviews of indigenous peoples:
    • Sample topics:
      • factors that sustain the identities and worldviews of indigenous peoples:
        • connections to family and community, the land, the spirits, and the ancestors
        • Elders’ presence, guidance, and wisdom
        • speaking the indigenous language of one’s own people
        • ceremonial practices
        • oral traditions
      • factors that challenge the identities and worldviews of indigenous peoples:
        • disconnection from traditional territories and cultural teachings
        • evolution of a sense of indigeneity
        • impact of residential schools and modern education
        • stereotypes and institutionalized racism
        • media portrayals and representations of indigenous peoples
        • legislation (e.g., Indian Act, Bill C-31, enfranchisement)
        • migration to urban areas
  • resilience and survival of indigenous peoples in the face of colonialism:
    • Sample topics:
      • resurgence of traditional forms of art, literature, dance, and music
      • emergence of contemporary indigenous arts
      • indigenous websites and social media
      • indigenous literature
      • increased presence in academia, and decolonization of places of study and learning
      • language revitalization
      • practice of traditional systems, including protocols and ceremonies
  • community development, partnerships, and control of economic opportunities:
    • Sample topics:
      • economic strategies and approaches:
        • joint ventures
        • co-management partnerships
        • community development corporations, co-operatives, public-private partnerships
      • consultation versus collaboration to foster economic development
      • use of natural resources (e.g., oil, natural gas, diamonds, forestry, minerals, fisheries)
      • conflicting views of stewardship, ownership, and use of lands and resources
  • responses to inequities in the relationships of indigenous peoples with governments in Canada and around the world:
    • Sample topics:
      • United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (Framework for Reconciliation)
      • national organizations
      • local and regional indigenous organizations
      • modern treaties and self-government
      • Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples
      • Indian Residential Settlement Agreement
      • Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada
      • disputes over land rights and use (e.g., Oka, Ipperwash, Gustafsen Lake)
      • Metis status and rights (e.g., Daniels case)
      • advocacy and activism
  • restoring balance through truth, healing, and reconciliation in Canada and around the world:
    • Sample topics:
      • Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples
      • Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada and Calls to Action
      • community healing initiatives
      • cultural resilience (e.g., language, art, music, and dance as healing)
      • culturally relevant systems (e.g., restorative justice model)
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
Les identités, les visions du monde et les langues des peuples autochtones sont renouvelées, maintenues et transformées par leurs liens avec la terre.
Les peuples autochtones se réapproprient un bien-être mental, émotionnel, physique et spirituel en dépit des effets continus du colonialisme.
Les peuples autochtones continuent de défendre et d’affirmer leurs droits à l’autodétermination.
La réconciliation exige que toutes les sociétés coloniales travaillent ensemble à promouvoir la guérison et à répondre aux injustices.
 
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les démarches d’investigation liées à l’étude des sciences humaines et sociales pour poser des questions; pour prêter écoute à la tradition orale des aînés et d’autres détenteurs de savoir local; pour recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées; et enfin pour communiquer ses résultats et ses conclusions
  • Au moyen de principes du savoir autochtones (holistique, expérientiel et relationnel), mieux comprendre les liens et les interrelations des peuples autochtones avec la terre
  • Déterminer et comparer l'importance des interrelations entre peuples, lieux, événements et cours des choses à une époque et en un lieu donnés, et déterminer ce que ces liens révèlent des questions du passé et du présent (portée)
  • Au moyen des protocoles adéquats, poser des questions et corroborer les inférences des aînés et d'autres détenteurs de savoir local par l'entremise des traditions orales, du savoir autochtone, des souvenirs, de l'histoire et des récits (preuves)
  • Comparer et opposer les éléments de continuité et de changement selon les groupes, les lieux et les époques (continuité et changement)
  • Déterminer comment la conjoncture et les actions individuelles ou collectives influent sur les événements, les décisions ou le cours des choses, et en analyser les multiples conséquences (causes et conséquences) 
  • Expliquer différents points de vue au sujet de personnes, de lieux, d'enjeux ou d'événements du passé ou du présent, en tenant compte des normes, des valeurs, des visions du monde et des croyances dominantes, et en tirer des conclusions (perspective) 
  • Porter des jugements éthiques raisonnés sur des actions du passé et du présent (jugement éthique)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • pour prêter écoute à la tradition orale des aînés et d’autres détenteurs de savoir local; pour recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées; et enfin pour communiquer ses résultats et ses conclusions :
    • Compétences clés :
      • Tirer des conclusions sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • Évaluer et défendre divers points de vue sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • Faire preuve d’initiative en planifiant, en adoptant et en évaluant des stratégies pour aborder un problème ou un enjeu
      • Relever et clarifier un problème ou un enjeu
      • Évaluer et organiser les données recueillies (p. ex. à partir de plans, de sommaires, de notes, de schémas chronologiques, de tableaux)
      • Interpréter l’information et les données provenant de cartes, graphiques et tableaux divers
      • Interpréter et présenter de l’information ou des données sous diverses formes (p. ex. orale, écrite et graphique)
      • Citer ses sources avec exactitude
      • Préparer des graphiques, des tableaux et des cartes pour communiquer des idées et de l’information, en démontrant un usage approprié des grilles, des échelles, des légendes et des courbes
  • Utiliser les compétences et les démarches d’investigation liées à l’étude des sciences humaines et sociales pour poser des questions; :
    • Compétences clés :
      • Tirer des conclusions sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • Évaluer et défendre divers points de vue sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • Faire preuve d’initiative en planifiant, en adoptant et en évaluant des stratégies pour aborder un problème ou un enjeu
      • Relever et clarifier un problème ou un enjeu
      • Évaluer et organiser les données recueillies (p. ex. à partir de plans, de sommaires, de notes, de schémas chronologiques, de tableaux)
      • Interpréter l’information et les données provenant de cartes, graphiques et tableaux divers
      • Interpréter et présenter de l’information ou des données sous diverses formes (p. ex. orale, écrite et graphique)
      • Citer ses sources avec exactitude
      • Préparer des graphiques, des tableaux et des cartes pour communiquer des idées et de l’information, en démontrant un usage approprié des grilles, des échelles, des légendes et des courbes
  • protocoles : Les peuples autochtones locaux peuvent disposer de protocoles à observer pour demander la permission d’utiliser leurs traditions orales et leur savoir, et pour en guider l’utilisation
  • Comparer et opposer les éléments de continuité et de changement selon les groupes, les lieux et les époques (continuité et changement) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels facteurs mènent à des situations de continuité ou de changement qui affectent différemment divers groupes?
      • Comment les processus graduels et les changements plus soudains affectent-ils les personnes qui les vivent? Quel processus de changement exerce plus d’effet sur la société?
      • Comment perçoit-on les périodes de continuité ou de changement lorsqu’on les vit par opposition à après coup?
    • Exemple d’activités :
      • Comparer la façon dont différents groupes ont profité d’un changement particulier ou en ont été éprouvés
  • Déterminer comment la conjoncture et les actions individuelles ou collectives influent sur les événements, les décisions ou le cours des choses, et en analyser les multiples conséquences (causes et conséquences) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quel rôle le hasard joue-t-il dans les événements, les décisions et le cours des choses?
      • Certains événements ont-ils des retombées à long terme positives mais des conséquences immédiates négatives, ou vice versa?
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • Déterminer si les résultats d’une action donnée relèvent d’une conséquence intentionnelle ou non
      • Évaluer les causes ou les conséquences les plus importantes de divers événements, décisions ou cours des choses
  • Expliquer différents points de vue au sujet de personnes, de lieux, d’enjeux ou d’événements du passé ou du présent, en tenant compte des normes, des valeurs, des visions du monde et des croyances dominantes, et en tirer des conclusions (perspective) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelles sources d’information peut-on utiliser aujourd’hui pour tenter de comprendre ce que l’on croyait à une époque et en un lieu donnés?
      • Jusqu’à quel point pouvons-nous généraliser les valeurs et les croyances d’une société ou d’une époque données?
      • Est-il équitable de juger les acteurs de l’histoire en utilisant des valeurs modernes?
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • Expliquer comment les personnes qui divergent d’opinion sur un même enjeu peuvent être influencées par leurs croyances
  • Porter des jugements éthiques raisonnés sur des actions du passé et du présent (jugement éthique) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelle est la différence entre valeurs implicites et valeurs explicites?
      • Pourquoi devrait-on tenir compte du contexte historique, politique et social lorsque l’on porte des jugements éthiques?
      • Doit-on aujourd’hui assumer la responsabilité des actions du passé?
      • Doit-on célébrer les personnages historiques pour leurs réalisations s’ils ont aussi posé des gestes aujourd’hui considérés comme étant contraires à l’éthique?
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • Évaluer la responsabilité de personnages historiques face à un événement important. Évaluer quel degré de responsabilité doit être attribué à différentes personnes et déterminer si leurs actions étaient bien fondées dans un contexte historique donné
      • Étudier diverses sources médiatiques sur un enjeu et évaluer jusqu’à quel point le langage contient des jugements moraux implicites ou explicites
content_fr: 
  • Diverses identités et visions du monde des peuples autochtones, et l'importance des liens entre familles, relations, langues, cultures et terre
  • Facteurs qui maintiennent les identités et visions du monde des peuples autochtones et facteurs qui les mettent en question
  • Résistance et survie des peuples autochtones face au colonialisme
  • Développement communautaire, partenariats et contrôle des débouchés économiques
  • Réactions aux iniquités dans les relations entre peuples autochtones et gouvernements, au Canada et ailleurs dans le monde
  • Restauration de l'équilibre grâce à la vérité, à la guérison et à la réconciliation, au Canada et ailleurs dans le monde
content elaborations fr: 
  • Diverses identités et visions du monde des peuples autochtones, et l'importance des liens entre familles, relations, langues, cultures et terre :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les différentes visions du monde des membres de différentes cultures, découlant de leurs croyances, valeurs, pratiques et expériences
      • liens avec la terre tels qu'exprimés par la langue, la culture, les valeurs et les pratiques
      • liens au sein de la famille, avec les aînés et la communauté
      • appartenance à la communauté, qui influe sur l'identité individuelle
      • rôles, responsabilités et expériences en tant que membre d'un ou de plusieurs groupes culturels, et influence sur l'identité individuelle
      • concepts de respect, de réciprocité, de pertinence, de responsabilité et de résilience
  • Facteurs qui maintiennent les identités et visions du monde des peuples autochtones et facteurs qui les mettent en question :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • facteurs qui maintiennent les identités et visions du monde des peuples autochtones :
        • liens avec la famille et la communauté, la terre, les esprits et les ancêtres
        • présence et sagesse des aînés, l'orientation qu'ils prodiguent
        • utilisation de la langue autochtone de son peuple
        • pratiques cérémoniales
        • traditions orales
      • facteurs qui mettent en question les identités et visions du monde des peuples autochtones :
        • rupture des liens avec les territoires traditionnels et les enseignements culturels
        • évolution du sentiment d'appartenance autochtone
        • impact des pensionnats et de l'éducation moderne
        • stéréotypes et racisme institutionnalisé
        • représentations médiatiques et autres représentations des peuples autochtones
        • législation (Loi sur les Indiens, projet de loi C-31, droit de vote, etc.)
        • migration vers les villes
  • Résistance et survie des peuples autochtones face au colonialisme :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • résurgence de formes traditionnelles d'art, de littérature, de danse et de musique
      • émergence des arts autochtones contemporains
      • sites Web et médias sociaux autochtones
      • littérature autochtone
      • présence accrue dans les cercles universitaires et décolonisation des lieux d'étude et d'apprentissage
      • revitalisation des langues
      • pratique de systèmes traditionnels, notamment protocoles et cérémonies
  • Développement communautaire, partenariats et contrôle des débouchés économiques :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • stratégies et démarches économiques :
        • coentreprises
        • partenariats de cogestion
        • sociétés de développement communautaire, coopératives, partenariats publics-privés
      • consultation vs collaboration pour promouvoir le développement économique
      • utilisation des ressources naturelles (p. ex. pétrole, gaz naturel, diamants, foresterie, minerais, pêche)
      • visions contradictoires de l'intendance, de la propriété et de l'utilisation de la terre et des ressources
  • Réactions aux iniquités dans les relations entre peuples autochtones et gouvernements, au Canada et ailleurs dans le monde :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • Déclaration des Nations Unies sur les droits des peuples autochtones (cadre pour la réconciliation)
      • organisations nationales
      • organisations autochtones locales et régionales
      • traités modernes et autonomie gouvernementale
      • Commission royale sur les peuples autochtones
      • Convention de règlement relative aux pensionnats indiens
      • Commission de vérité et de réconciliation du Canada
      • conflits au sujet des droits territoriaux et de l'utilisation des terres (p. ex. Oka, Ipperwash, Gustafsen Lake)
      • statut et droits des Métis (p. ex. affaire Daniels)
      • défense des droits et militantisme
  • Restauration de l'équilibre grâce à la vérité, à la guérison et à la réconciliation, au Canada et ailleurs dans le monde :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • Commission royale sur les peuples autochtones
      • rapport final de la Commission de vérité et de réconciliation du Canada et appels à l'action
      • initiatives communautaires pour la guérison
      • résilience culturelle (p. ex. langue, art, musique et danse pour guérir)
      • systèmes pertinents sur le plan culturel (p. ex. modèles de justice réparatrice, etc.)
PDF Only: 
Yes
Curriculum Status: 
2019/20
Has French Translation: 
Yes