Curriculum Études asiatiques, de 1850 à aujourd'hui 12e

Subject: 
Asian Studies
Grade: 
Grade 12
Big Ideas: 
The breadth and diversity of Asia’s physical and human resources have contributed to the development of distinct and disparate political, cultural, and economic regions in the late 20th century.
Colonialism, imperialism, and resource disparity have been the primary reasons for conflict and movement of peoples in Asia.
Ethnic, regional, and national identities, shaped in part by geography and migration, exert significant political and cultural influence in Asia.
Rapid industrialization, urbanization, and economic growth in Asia in the late 20th century have created complex environmental challenges.
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Assess the significance of people, locations, events, or developments, and compare varying perspectives on their historical significance at particular times and places, and from group to group (significance)
  • Assess the justification for competing historical accounts after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence (evidence)
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups (continuity and change)
  • Assess how prevailing conditions and the actions of individuals or groups affect events, decisions, or developments (cause and consequence)
  • Explain different perspectives on past or present people, locations, issues, or events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about actions in the past and present (ethical judgment)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Key skills:
      • Draw conclusions about a problem, an issue, or a topic.
      • Assess and defend a variety of positions on a problem, an issue, or a topic.
      • Demonstrate leadership by planning, implementing, and assessing strategies to address a problem or an issue.
      • Identify and clarify a problem or issue.
      • Evaluate and organize collected data (e.g., in outlines, summaries, notes, timelines, charts).
      • Interpret information and data from a variety of maps, graphs, and tables.
      • Interpret and present data in a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, and graphic).
      • Accurately cite sources.
      • Construct graphs, tables, and maps to communicate ideas and information, demonstrating appropriate use of grids, scales, legends, and contours.
  • Assess the significance of people, locations, events, or developments, and compare varying perspectives on their historical significance at particular times and places, and from group to group:
    • Key questions:
      • What factors can cause people, locations, events, or developments to become more or less significant?
      • What factors can make people, locations, events, or developments significant to different people?
      • What criteria should be used to assess the significance of people, locations, events, or developments?
    • Sample activities:
      • Use criteria to rank the most important people, locations, events, or developments in the current unit of study.
      • Compare how different groups assess the significance of people, locations, events, or developments.
  • Assess the justification for competing historical accounts after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence:
    • Key questions:
      • What criteria should be used to assess the reliability of a source?
      • How much evidence is sufficient in order to support a conclusion?
      • How much about various people, locations, events, or developments can be known and how much is unknowable?
    • Sample activities:
      • Compare and contrast multiple accounts of the same event and evaluate their usefulness as historical sources.
      • Examine what sources are available and what sources are missing, and evaluate how the available evidence shapes your perspective on the people, locations, events, or developments studied.
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups:
    • Key questions:
      • What factors lead to changes or continuities affecting groups of people differently?
      • How do gradual processes and more sudden rates of change affect people living through them? Which method of change has more of an effect on society?
      • How are periods of change or continuity perceived by the people living through them? How does this compare to how they are perceived after the fact?
    • Sample activity:
      • Compare how different groups benefited or suffered as a result of a particular change.
  • Assess how prevailing conditions and the actions of individuals or groups affect events, decisions, or developments:
    • Key questions:
      • What is the role of chance in particular events, decisions, or developments?
      • Are there events with positive long-term consequences but negative short-term consequences, or vice versa?
    • Sample activities:
      • Assess whether the results of a particular action were intended or unintended consequences.
      • Evaluate the most important causes or consequences of various events, decisions, or developments.
  • Explain different perspectives on past or present people, locations, issues, or events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs:
    • Key questions:
      • What sources of information can people today use to try to understand what people in different times and places believed?
      • How much can we generalize about values and beliefs in a given society or time period?
      • Is it fair to judge people of the past using modern values?
    • Sample activity:
      • Explain how the beliefs of people on different sides of the same issue influence their opinions. 
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about actions in the past and present:
    • Key questions:
      • What is the difference between implicit and explicit values?
      • Why should we consider the historical, political, and social context when making ethical judgments?
      • Should people of today have any responsibility for actions taken in the past?
      • Can people of the past be celebrated for great achievements if they have also done things considered unethical today? 
    • Sample activities:
      • Assess the responsibility of historical figures for an important event. Assess how much responsibility should be assigned to different people, and evaluate whether their actions were justified given the historical context.
      • Examine various media sources on a topic and assess how much of the language contains implicit and explicit moral judgments.
Concepts and Content: 
  • resource distribution and physiographic features
  • demography, migration, urbanization, and environmental issues
  • industrialization, globalization, economic systems, and distribution of wealth
  • development, structure, and function of political and social institutions
  • social and political movements, including human rights initiatives
  • local, regional, and global conflict and co-operation
  • local, regional, and national identities
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • resource distribution and physiographic features:
    • Sample topics:
      • defining “Asia”
      • geographic features, population density, climates, and environments of Asia
      • natural borders, resource distribution, and impact of climate and physiographic features on trade, migration, and economies in Asia
  • demography, migration, urbanization, and environmental issues:
    • Sample topics:
      • migration within and away from Asia
      • population growth and decline
      • urbanization and the rise of megacities
      • role of the state and markets in affecting migration patterns
      • impact of climate change on livelihood
      • standards of living (rural versus urban, and between regions and countries)
  • industrialization, globalization, economic systems, and distribution of wealth:
    • Sample topics:
      • growth, poverty, and inequality
      • different standards of living and economic activities in Asian countries and regions
      • pros and cons of foreign trade and investment in Asia and with Asia
      • environmental sustainability and economic growth
      • labour conditions and economic development
      • export-led growth models
      • rapid post-war economic growth and development in Japan, Hong Kong, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan
      • role of the state in economic development
      • uneven development, urbanization, and growing inequality within and between countries (e.g., the move from rural to urban centres in China and Bangladesh)
  • development, structure, and function of political and social institutions:
    • Sample topics:
      • rise of contemporary nation-states
      • China (e.g., Chinese communism under Mao versus under Deng versus today)
      • Vietnam
      • India
      • ideologies
      • health systems
      • education systems
  • social and political movements, including human rights initiatives:
    • Sample topics:
      • aging populations in Japan and Korea
      • caste system in India
      • rise in economic inequality and youth unemployment
      • human rights issues (e.g., Rohingya, Uighurs, Tibet, North Korea; gender discrimination; honour killings) 
      • contemporary social and political movements, including indigenous rights (e.g., Umbrella Protests in Hong Kong)
      • Southeast Asia’s modern statehood and multi-ethnic, multi-faith, multilingual populations
      • European and US colonization, and national liberation movements
  • local, regional, and global conflict and co-operation:
    • Sample topics:
      • impact of colonialism in South, East, and Southeast Asia
      • Chinese Revolution
      • Indian independence movement
      • World War II in the Pacific
      • India–Pakistan partition
      • creation of Bangladesh
      • Korean War
      • Vietnam War
      • Sri Lankan ethnic conflict and civil war
  • local, regional, and national identities:
    • Sample topics:
      • India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh after the British Raj
      • linguistic groups
      • China
      • Vietnam and French influences
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
L’ampleur et la diversité des ressources physiques et humaines de l’Asie contribuent à l’émergence à la fin du XXe siècle de régions politiques, culturelles et économiques distinctes et hétérogènes.
Le colonialisme, l’impérialisme et la disparité des ressources sont historiquement les principales raisons de conflits et de mouvements de populations en Asie.
Les identités ethniques, régionales et nationales, en partie façonnées par la géographie et les migrations, exercent une influence politique et culturelle importante en Asie.
L’industrialisation, l’urbanisation et l’essor économique rapides de l’Asie à la fin du XXe siècle posent des problèmes environnementaux complexes.
 
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les démarches d'investigation liées à l'étude des sciences humaines et sociales pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées; et communiquer ses résultats et ses conclusions
  • Déterminer l'importance que peuvent revêtir les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses, et comparer divers points de vue en la matière selon les lieux, les époques et les groupes (portée)
  • Déterminer ce qui sous-tend les récits contradictoires après avoir étudié les points de divergence, la fiabilité des sources et le bien-fondé des preuves (preuves)
  • Comparer et opposer les éléments de continuité et de changement selon les groupes (continuité et changement)
  • Évaluer dans quelle mesure la conjoncture et les actions individuelles ou collectives influent sur les événements, les décisions ou le cours des choses (cause et conséquence)
  • Expliquer différents points de vue au sujet de personnes, de lieux, d'enjeux ou d'événements du passé ou du présent, en tenant compte des normes, des valeurs, des visions du monde et des croyances dominantes (perspective)
  • Porter des jugements éthiques raisonnés sur des actions du passé et du présent (jugement éthique)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les démarches d'investigation liées à l'étude des sciences humaines et sociales pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées; et communiquer ses résultats et ses conclusions :
    • Compétences clés :
      • Tirer des conclusions sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • Évaluer et défendre divers points de vue sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • Faire preuve d'initiative en planifiant, en adoptant et en évaluant des stratégies pour aborder un problème ou un enjeu
      • Relever et clarifier un problème ou un enjeu
      • Évaluer et organiser les données recueillies (p. ex. à partir de plans, de sommaires, de notes, de schémas chronologiques, de tableaux)
      • Interpréter l'information et les données provenant de cartes, graphiques et tableaux divers
      • Interpréter et présenter de l'information ou des données sous diverses formes (p. ex. orale, écrite et graphique)
      • Citer ses sources avec exactitude
      • Préparer des graphiques, des tableaux et des cartes pour communiquer des idées et de l'information, en démontrant un usage approprié des grilles, des échelles, des légendes et des courbes
  • Déterminer l'importance que peuvent revêtir les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses, et comparer divers points de vue en la matière selon les lieux, les époques et les groupes (portée) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels sont les facteurs qui font en sorte que les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses revêtent une importance plus ou moins grande?
      • Quels sont les facteurs qui déterminent l'importance que diverses personnes accordent aux autres, aux lieux, aux événements ou au cours des choses?
      • Quels critères devrait-on appliquer pour évaluer l'importance des personnes, des lieux, des événements et du cours des choses?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Utiliser des critères pour attribuer différents degrés d'importance aux personnes, aux lieux, aux événements et au cours des choses dans le cadre de l'unité d'apprentissage actuelle
      • Comparer la façon dont divers groupes évaluent l'importance des personnes, des lieux, des événements ou du cours des choses
  • Déterminer ce qui sous-tend les récits contradictoires après avoir étudié les points de divergence, la fiabilité des sources et le bien-fondé des preuves (preuves) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels critères devrait-on appliquer pour évaluer la fiabilité d'une source?
      • Combien de preuves sont suffisantes pour étayer une conclusion?
      • Quelle part des personnes, des lieux, des événements et du cours des choses peut-on connaître et quelle part est-il impossible de connaître?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Comparer et opposer les comptes rendus multiples d'un même événement et évaluer leur utilité à titre de sources historiques
      • Déterminer quelles sont les sources accessibles et les sources manquantes, et l'influence des preuves disponibles sur le point de vue que nous avons sur les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses à l'étude
  • Comparer et opposer les éléments de continuité et de changement selon les groupes (continuité et changement) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels facteurs mènent à des situations de continuité ou de changement qui affectent différemment divers groupes?
      • Comment les processus graduels et les changements plus soudains affectent-ils les personnes qui les vivent? Quel processus de changement exerce plus d'effet sur la société?
      • Comment perçoit-on les périodes de continuité ou de changement lorsqu'on les vit par opposition à après coup?
    • Exemple d'activités :
      • Comparer la façon dont différents groupes ont profité d'un changement particulier ou en ont été éprouvés
  • Évaluer dans quelle mesure la conjoncture et les actions individuelles ou collectives influent sur les événements, les décisions ou le cours des choses (cause et conséquence) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quel rôle le hasard joue-t-il dans les événements, les décisions ou le cours des choses?
      • Existe-t-il des événements qui ont des retombées à long terme positives mais des conséquences immédiates négatives, ou vice versa?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Déterminer si les résultats d'une action donnée relèvent d'une conséquence intentionnelle ou non.
      • Évaluer les causes ou les conséquences les plus importantes de divers événements, décisions ou cours des choses
  • Expliquer différents points de vue au sujet de personnes, de lieux, d'enjeux ou d'événements du passé ou du présent, en tenant compte des normes, des valeurs, des visions du monde et des croyances dominantes (perspective) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelles sources d'information peut-on aujourd'hui utiliser pour essayer de comprendre ce que croyaient les gens de diverses époques et en divers lieux?
      • Jusqu'à quel point peut-on généraliser les valeurs et les croyances d'une société ou d'une époque données?
      • Est-il équitable de juger les acteurs de l'histoire en utilisant des valeurs modernes?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Expliquer comment des personnes qui divergent d'opinion sur un même enjeu peuvent être influencées par leurs croyances
  • Porter des jugements éthiques raisonnés sur des actions du passé et du présent (jugement éthique) :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelle est la différence entre valeurs implicites et valeurs explicites?
      • Pourquoi devrait-on tenir compte du contexte historique, politique et social lorsque l'on porte des jugements éthiques?
      • Doit-on aujourd'hui porter la responsabilité pour les actions du passé?
      • Doit-on célébrer les personnages historiques pour leurs réalisations s'ils ont aussi posé des gestes aujourd'hui considérés comme étant contraires à l'éthique?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Évaluer la responsabilité de personnages historiques face à un événement important. Évaluer quel degré de responsabilité doit être attribué à différentes personnes et déterminer si leurs actions étaient bien fondées dans un contexte historique donné
      • Étudier diverses sources médiatiques sur un enjeu et évaluer jusqu'à quel point le langage employé contient des jugements moraux implicites ou explicites
content_fr: 
  • Distribution des ressources et caractéristiques physiographiques
  • Démographie, migration, urbanisation et enjeux environnementaux
  • Industrialisation, mondialisation, systèmes économiques et distribution des richesses
  • Développement, structure et fonction des institutions politiques et sociales
  • Mouvements sociaux et politiques, notamment initiatives en matière de droits de la personne
  • Coopération et conflits locaux, régionaux et généralisés
  • Identités locales, régionales et nationales
content elaborations fr: 
  • Distribution des ressources et caractéristiques physiographiques :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • définition de ce qu'est l'Asie
      • caractéristiques géographiques, densité de population, climats et environnements de l'Asie
      • frontières naturelles, distribution des ressources et impact des caractéristiques climatiques et physiographiques sur le commerce, les migrations et les économies de l'Asie
  • Démographie, migration, urbanisation et enjeux environnementaux :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • migration à l'intérieur et à l'extérieur du continent asiatique
      • croissance et déclin démographique
      • urbanisation et émergence des mégavilles
      • influence de l'État et des marchés sur les mouvements migratoires
      • impact des changements climatiques sur les moyens de subsistance
      • niveaux de vie (rural par opposition à urbain, régional par opposition à national)
  • Industrialisation, mondialisation, systèmes économiques et distribution des richesses :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • croissance, pauvreté et inégalités
      • différents niveaux de vie et différentes activités économiques dans les pays et les régions de l'Asie
      • avantages et inconvénients du commerce international et des investissements en Asie et avec l'Asie
      • pérennité environnementale et croissance économique
      • conditions de travail et développement économique
      • modèles de croissance alimentés par l'exportation
      • croissance économique et développement accélérés dans l'après-guerre au Japon, à Hong Kong, à Singapour, en Corée du Sud et à Taïwan
      • rôle de l'État dans le développement économique
      • développement inégal, urbanisation et iniquités grandissantes à l'intérieur des pays et entre ceux-ci (exode rural en Chine et au Bangladesh, etc.)
  • Développement, structure et fonction des institutions politiques et sociales :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • émergence des États-nations modernes
      • Chine (communisme chinois de Mao à aujourd'hui, en passant par le régime de Deng Xiaoping)
      • Vietnam
      • Inde
      • idéologies
      • systèmes de santé
      • systèmes d'éducation
  • Mouvements sociaux et politiques, notamment initiatives en matière de droits de la personne :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • vieillissement de la population au Japon et en Corée
      • système de castes en Inde
      • exacerbation des inégalités économiques, augmentation du chômage des jeunes
      • enjeux des droits de la personne (Rohingyas, Ouïgours, Tibétains, Nord-Coréens; discrimination en fonction du sexe, crimes d'honneur)
      • mouvements sociaux et politiques contemporains, notamment la protection des droits des populations indigènes (mouvement des parapluies à Hong Kong)
      • émergence d'États modernes en Asie du Sud-Est et de populations multiethniques, multiconfessionnelles et plurilingues
      • colonisation européenne et américaine, et mouvements de libération nationale
  • Coopération et conflits locaux, régionaux et généralisés :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • impact du colonialisme en Asie du Sud, de l'Est et du Sud-Est
      • révolution chinoise
      • mouvement d'indépendance de l'Inde
      • Seconde Guerre mondiale dans le Pacifique
      • partition Inde-Pakistan
      • création de l'État du Bangladesh
      • Guerre de Corée
      • Guerre du Vietnam
      • conflit ethnique et guerre civile au Sri Lanka
  • Identités locales, régionales et nationales :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • Inde, Pakistan et Bangladesh après l'Empire britannique (Raj)
      • groupes linguistiques
      • Chine
      • Vietnam et influences de la France
PDF Only: 
Yes
Curriculum Status: 
2019/20
Has French Translation: 
Yes