Curriculum Social Studies Grade 3

Subject: 
Social Studies
Grade: 
Grade 3
Big Ideas: 
Learning about indigenous peoples nurtures multicultural awareness and respect for diversity.
People from diverse cultures and societies share some common experiences and aspects of life.
Indigenous knowledge is passed down through oral history, traditions, and collective memory.
Indigenous societies throughout the world value the well-being of the self, the land, spirits, and ancestors.
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Explain why people, events, or places are significant to various individuals and groups (significance)
  • Ask questions, make inferences, and draw conclusions about the content and features of different types of sources (evidence)
  • Sequence objects, images, or events, and explain why some aspects change and others stay the same (continuity and change)
  • Recognize the causes and consequences of events, decisions, or developments (cause and consequence)
  • Explain why people’s beliefs, values, worldviews, experiences, and roles give them different perspectives on people, places, issues, or events
  • Make value judgments about events, decisions, or actions, and suggest lessons that can be learned (ethical judgment)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Key skills:
      • Ask relevant questions to clarify and define a selected problem or issue
      • Demonstrate a willingness to use imagining and predicting in relation to a selected problem or issue
      • Compare, classify, and identify patterns in information about a selected problem or issue
      • Recognize that symbols are used to represent concrete and abstract ideas (e.g., the sheaves of wheat on the Saskatchewan flag represent the importance of wheat farming to that province; a dove represents peace)
      • Identify the significance of symbols and colours on maps (e.g., colours to represent economic activity, various types of lines to represent roads and railways, symbols for capital cities)
      • Interpret information on simple maps using cardinal directions, symbols, and legends
      • Create simple maps to represent the community and one or more other communities within BC and Canada
      • Use simple map grids (e.g., letter-number co-ordinates) to identify specific locations
      • Gather information on a topic from more than one source (e.g., book, magazine, web site, interview)
      • Apply strategies for information gathering (e.g., using headings, indices, tables of contents)
      • Record information from various sources, demonstrating appropriate strategies for note taking (e.g., key words, main ideas, point form)
      • Cite information sources appropriately (e.g., simple bibliography)
      • Select information for a presentation on a topic (e.g., a specific province or territory)
      • Draw simple interpretations from personal experiences and oral, visual, and written sources
      • Organize relevant information for a presentation
      • Deliver an engaging presentation on a topic
      • Generate a variety of responses to a specific problem or issue
      • Consider advantages and disadvantages of a variety of solutions to a problem or issue
      • Individually, or in groups, design a course of action to address a problem or issue, and provide reasons to support the action
      • Demonstrate willingness to consider diverse points of view
  • Explain why people, events, or places are significant to various individuals and groups:
    • Key questions:
      • Why are stories important to indigenous people?
      • Why do Elders play and important part in the lives of First Peoples?
      • What values were significant for local First Peoples?
  • Ask questions, make inferences, and draw conclusions about the content and features of different types of sources:
    • Sample activity:
      • View different artifacts from indigenous cultures and speculate on what they might have been used for
  • Sequence objects, images, or events, and explain why some aspects change and others stay the same:
    • Sample activities:
      • Use examples to show that events happen in chronological sequence (e.g., last month, yesterday, today, tomorrow, next month)
      • Organize and present information in chronological order (e.g., before, now, later; past, present, future)
    • Key questions:
      • How has the way of life changed for indigenous people?
      • How are indigenous cultures viewed today?
      • How have First Peoples government and leadership changed over time?
  • Recognize the causes and consequences of events, decisions, or developments
    • Key questions:
      • How might present-day Canada be different if First Peoples had not been moved to reserves?
      • How has the way of life changed for indigenous people?
  • Explain why people’s beliefs, values, worldviews, experiences, and roles give them different perspectives on people, places, issues, or events:
    • Sample activities:
      • Distinguish between fact and opinion on a selected problem or issue
      • Identify features of indigenous cultures that characterize their relationship to the land
      • Indigenous peoples’ use of oral tradition rather than written language
    • Key questions:
      • How do the values of indigenous people differ from the values of people from other cultures?
  • Make value judgments about events, decisions, or actions, and suggest lessons that can be learned:
    • Key questions:
      • Is the technology we have today better than the traditional technology of indigenous peoples?
      • What would be the advantages or disadvantages of consensus decision making?
      • Should indigenous cultures and languages be maintained? Explain your reasons.
      • Should anything be done about the loss of indigenous lands? Explain your reasons.
Concepts and Content: 
  • cultural characteristics and ways of life of local First Peoples and global indigenous peoples
  • aspects of life shared by and common to peoples and cultures
  • interconnections of cultural and technological innovations of global and local indigenous peoples
  • governance and social organization in local and global indigenous societies
  • oral history, traditional stories, and artifacts as evidence about past First Peoples cultures
  • relationship between humans and their environment
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • cultural characteristics and ways of life of local First Peoples and global indigenous peoples:
    • Sample topics:
      • potential First Peoples and global indigenous people for study could include:
        • Local BC First Peoples
        • Canadian and other North American indigenous people
        • local indigenous peoples of South America
        • ethnic Chinese and Koreans
        • ethnic European groups (Germanic, Slavic, Latin, Celtic)
      • worldview, protocols, celebrations, ceremonies, dance, music, spiritual beliefs, art, values, kinship, traditional teachings
  • aspects of life shared by and common to peoples and cultures:
    • Sample topics:
      • family
      • work
      • education
      • systems of ethics and spirituality
  • interconnections of cultural and technological innovations of global and local indigenous peoples:
    • Sample topics:
      • transportation
      • clothing
      • pottery
      • shelters and buildings
      • navigation
      • weapons
      • tools
      • hunting and fishing techniques
      • building techniques
      • food cultivation and preparation
      • ceremonies
      • art
      • music
      • basketry and weaving
  • governance and social organization in local and global indigenous societies:
    • Sample topics:
      • consensus
      • confederacies
      • Elders
      • reservations
      • band councils
      • traditional leadership
  • oral history, traditional stories, and artifacts as evidence about past First Peoples cultures:
    • Sample topics:
      • tools
      • earth mounds
      • petroglyphs
      • oral stories
      • sacred or significant places and landforms
      • weapons
  • relationship between humans and their environment:
    • Sample topics:
      • protocols around the world that acknowledge and respect the land
      • reshaping of the land for resource exploration and development
      • domestication of animals
      • organization and techniques of hunting and fishing
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
S’informer sur les peuples autochtones contribue au développement de la conscience multiculturelle et au respect de la diversité.
Les personnes provenant de diverses cultures et sociétés ont en commun certaines expériences et certains aspects de la vie.
Le savoir autochtone est transmis par l’histoire orale, les traditions et la mémoire collective.
Les sociétés autochtones du monde entier accordent de la valeur au bien-être de l’individu, de la Terre, des esprits et des ancêtres.
 
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions
  • Expliquer pourquoi les personnes, les événements ou les lieux sont importants pour divers groupes et individus (portée)
  • Poser des questions, faire des déductions par inférence et tirer des conclusions sur le contenu et les caractéristiques de différents types de sources (preuves)
  • Ordonner des objets, des images ou des événements, et expliquer pourquoi certains aspects ont changé alors que d’autres n’ont pas changé (continuité et changement)
  • Reconnaître les causes et les conséquences des événements, des décisions ou des développements (causes et conséquences)
  • Expliquer pourquoi les croyances, les valeurs, la vision du monde, les expériences et les rôles ont une incidence sur la perception des personnes, des lieux, des enjeux ou des événements (perspective)
  • Porter des jugements de valeur sur des événements, des décisions ou des actions, et suggérer des leçons à retenir (jugement éthique)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions:
    • Compétences clés :
      • poser des questions pertinentes pour définir et clarifier un problème ou une question
      • faire des prédictions au sujet d’un problème ou d’une question
      • comparer et classer les informations sur un problème ou une question, et relever des récurrences dans ces informations
      • interpréter l’information sur une carte simple au moyen des points cardinaux, des symboles et des légendes
      • créer des cartes simples pour représenter une ou plusieurs communautés de la Colombie-Britannique et du Canada
      • recueillir de l’information sur un sujet dans plus d’une source (p. ex. livre, magazine, site Web, entrevue)
      • mettre en pratique des stratégies de collecte d’information (p. ex. utiliser les sous-titres, l’index, la table des matières)
      • citer convenablement les sources d’information (p. ex. bibliographie simple)
      • individuellement ou en groupe, imaginer un plan d’action pour aborder un problème ou une question, et donner des arguments pour justifier les actions
  • Expliquer pourquoi les personnes, les événements ou les lieux sont importants pour divers groupes et personnes:
    • Questions clés :
      • Pourquoi les histoires sont-elles importantes pour les peuples autochtones?
      • Pourquoi les Aînés jouent-ils un rôle important dans la vie des Autochtones?
      • Quelles valeurs étaient importantes pour les peuples autochtones de la région?
  • Poser des questions, faire des déductions par inférence et tirer des conclusions sur le contenu et les caractéristiques de différents types de sources:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • Observer différents artéfacts de cultures autochtones et spéculer sur leur utilisation
  • Ordonner des objets, des images ou des événements, et expliquer pourquoi certains aspects ont changé alors que d’autres n’ont pas changé:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • à l’aide d’exemples, montrer que les événements se succèdent dans le temps (p. ex. le mois dernier, hier, aujourd’hui, demain, le mois prochain)
      • organiser et présenter de l’information en ordre chronologique (avant, maintenant, plus tard; passé, présent, futur)
    • Questions clés :
      • Comment le mode de vie des peuples autochtones a-t-il changé?
      • Comment les cultures autochtones sont-elles perçues aujourd’hui?
      • Comment la gouvernance et les dirigeants des peuples autochtones ont-ils changé avec le temps?
  • Reconnaître les causes et les conséquences des événements, des décisions ou des développements:
    • Questions clés :
      • En quoi le Canada d’aujourd’hui serait-il différent si les peuples autochtones n’avaient pas été déplacés dans des réserves?
      • Comment le mode de vie des peuples autochtones a-t-il changé?
  • Expliquer pourquoi les croyances, les valeurs, la vision du monde, les expériences et les rôles ont une incidence sur la perception des personnes, des lieux, des enjeux ou des événements:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • faire la distinction entre un fait et une opinion sur un problème ou une question
      • relever les traits des cultures autochtones qui caractérisent leur relation avec la Terre
      • expliquer l’usage de la tradition orale au lieu de la langue écrite chez les peuples autochtones
    • Question clé :
      • En quoi les valeurs des peuples autochtones diffèrent-elles des valeurs des autres peuples?
  • Porter des jugements de valeur sur des événements, des décisions ou des actions, et suggérer des leçons à retenir:
    • Questions clés :
      • La technologie que nous possédons aujourd’hui est-elle meilleure que la technologie traditionnelle des peuples autochtones?
      • Quels sont les avantages et les inconvénients de la prise de décision par consensus?
      • Faut-il sauvegarder les cultures et les langues autochtones? Justifier.
      • Faut-il intervenir au sujet de la perte des terres autochtones? Justifier.
content_fr: 
  • Les caractéristiques culturelles et modes de vie des peuples autochtones locaux et des peuples autochtones du monde
  • Les aspects de la vie qu’ont en commun les personnes et les cultures
  • L’interdépendance des innovations culturelles et technologiques des peuples autochtones de la région et du monde
  • La gouvernance et l’organisation sociale des sociétés autochtones de la région et du monde
  • La tradition orale, les histoires traditionnelles et les objets comme témoins des cultures autochtones du passé
  • La relation entre l’humain et son environnement
content elaborations fr: 
  • Les caractéristiques culturelles et modes de vie des peuples autochtones locaux et des peuples autochtones du monde:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • exemples de peuples autochtones du Canada et du monde pouvant être étudiés :
        • Premières Nations de la C.-B.
        • peuples autochtones du Canada ou d'autres endroits en Amérique du Nord
        • peuples autochtones d’Amérique du Sud
        • groupes ethniques chinois et coréens
        • groupes ethniques européens (Germaniques, Slaves, Latins, Celtes)
      • visions du monde, protocoles, célébrations, cérémonies, danse, musique, croyances spirituelles, art, valeurs, liens de parenté, enseignements traditionnels
  • Les aspects de la vie qu’ont en commun les personnes et les cultures:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • famille
      • travail
      • éducation
      • codes d’éthique et spiritualité
  • L’interdépendance des innovations culturelles et technologiques des peuples autochtones de la région et du monde:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • transports
      • vêtements
      • poterie
      • abris et bâtiments
      • navigation
      • armes
      • outils
      • techniques de chasse et de pêche
      • techniques de construction
      • agriculture et cuisine
      • cérémonies
      • art
      • musique
      • vannerie et tissage
  • La gouvernance et l’organisation sociale des sociétés autochtones de la région et du monde:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • consensus
      • confédérations
      • Aînés
      • réserves
      • conseils de bande
      • chefs traditionnels
  • La tradition orale, les histoires traditionnelles et les objets comme témoins des cultures autochtones du passé:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • outils
      • cumulus
      • pétroglyphes
      • histoires orales
      • lieux ou reliefs sacrés ou significatifs
      • armes
  • La relation entre l’humain et son environnement:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les différents témoignages de gratitude et de respect pour la Terre dans le monde
      • la transformation de la Terre pour l’exploration et l’exploitation des ressources
      • la domestication des animaux
      • l’organisation et les techniques de chasse et de pêche
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes