Curriculum Social Studies Grade 1

Subject: 
Social Studies
Grade: 
Grade 1
Big Ideas: 
We shape the local environment, and the local environment shapes who we are and how we live.
Our rights, roles, and responsibilities are important for building strong communities.
Healthy communities recognize and respect the diversity of individuals and care for the local environment.
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Explain the significance of personal or local events, objects, people, or places (significance)
  • Ask questions, make inferences, and draw conclusions about the content and features of different types of sources (evidence)
  • Sequence objects, images, or events, and distinguish between what has changed and what has stayed the same (continuity and change)
  • Recognize causes and consequences of events, decisions, or developments in their lives (cause and consequence)
  • Explore different perspectives on people, places, issues, or events in their lives (perspective)
  • Identify fair and unfair aspects of events, decisions, or actions in their lives and consider appropriate courses of action (ethical judgment)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Key skills:
      • Recognize that maps are used to represent real places and relate pictorial representations to their physical locations.
      • Follow a path to a destination using a pictorial representation (e.g., picture map).
      • Access information from audio, visual, material, or print sources.
      • Collect information from personal experiences, oral sources, and visual representations.
      • Make comparisons to discover similarities and differences.
      • With teacher prompts, make simple interpretations from information gathered (e.g., families have similar needs, families have differences).
      • Use oral, written, or visual communication forms to accomplish given presentation tasks (e.g., show and tell, captioned pictures).
      • Brainstorm, discuss, and compare possible solutions to a selected problem.
  • Explain the significance of personal or local events, objects, people, or places:
    • Sample activities:
      • Brainstorm a list of the most significant places in your community and explain why these locations are important.
      • Research the history of a significant event or person in the history of your community.
    • Key question:
      • How does the significance of various events, objects, people, and places change over time?
  • Ask questions, make inferences, and draw conclusions about the content and features of different types of sources:
    • Sample activities:
      • Compare old and new pictures of locations in your community and discuss how things have changed over time.
      • Propose reasons for important events in your community and compare your hypotheses with the explanations of historians or other experts.
      • Investigate the history of a significant person in your community using sources like news articles, photographs, and videos.
  • Sequence objects, images, or events, and distinguish between what has changed and what has stayed the same:
    • Sample activities:
      • Create a visual timeline for important community events using photographs or drawings.
      • Compare changes in technology in your parents’ and grandparents’ time.
      • Distinguish between scheduled and unscheduled events.
Concepts and Content: 
  • characteristics of the local community that provide organization and meet the needs of the community
  • diverse cultures, backgrounds, and perspectives within the local and other communities
  • relationships between a community and its environment
  • roles, rights, and responsibilities in the local community
  • key events and developments in the local community, and in local First Peoples communities
  • natural and human-made features of the local environment
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • characteristics of the local community that provide organization and meet the needs of the community:
    • Sample topics:
      • local government
      • public utilities
      • emergency services
      • policing
      • transportation
      • stores
      • characteristics of the local community that provide organization and meet the needs of the community:
        • Sample topics:
          • local government
          • public utilities
          • emergency services
          • policing
          • transportation
          • stores
          • parks and other recreational areas
          • financial services
      • diverse cultures, backgrounds, and perspectives within the local and other communities:
        • Sample topic:
          • different languages, customs, art, music, traditions, holidays, food, clothing, and dress
      • relationships between a community and its environment:
        • Sample topics:
          • natural resource industries
          • parks and other natural areas
          • population growth and new construction
          • water and sewage treatment
        • Key questions:
          • How does your community depend on the local environment?
          • What effects do the activities in your community have on the environment?
      • roles, rights, and responsibilities in the local community:
        • Sample topics:
          • individual rights and interests versus the “public interest”
          • responsibilities to other people and the environment
        • Key questions:
          • Who gets to make decisions and why?
          • How do decisions affect different people?
      • key events and developments in the local community, and in local First Peoples communities:
        • Sample topics:
          • community milestones (e.g., the founding of the community, the opening and closing of local businesses, the construction of new buildings)
          • celebrations and holidays
          • cultural events
          • growth or decline of a community
        • Key questions:
          • What is the most significant event in your local community’s history?
          • How is your community different now from what it was like before settlers arrived?
      • natural and human-made features of the local environment:
        • Sample topics:
          • natural features: mountains, forests, waterways, local plants and animals
          • human-made features: buildings, bridges, dams, dykes
        • Key question:
          • How does the rural environment differ from the urban environment?
      • parks and other recreational areas
      • financial services
  • diverse cultures, backgrounds, and perspectives within the local and other communities:
    • Sample topic:
      • different languages, customs, art, music, traditions, holidays, food, clothing, and dress
  • relationships between a community and its environment:
    • Sample topics:
      • natural resource industries
      • parks and other natural areas
      • population growth and new construction
      • water and sewage treatment
    • Key questions:
      • How does your community depend on the local environment?
      • What effects do the activities in your community have on the environment?
  • roles, rights, and responsibilities in the local community:
    • Sample topics:
      • individual rights and interests versus the “public interest”
      • responsibilities to other people and the environment
    • Key questions:
      • Who gets to make decisions and why?
      • How do decisions affect different people?
  • key events and developments in the local community, and in local First Peoples communities:
    • Sample topics:
      • community milestones (e.g., the founding of the community, the opening and closing of local businesses, the construction of new buildings)
      • celebrations and holidays
      • cultural events
      • growth or decline of a community
    • Key questions:
      • What is the most significant event in your local community’s history?
      • How is your community different now from what it was like before settlers arrived?
  • natural and human-made features of the local environment:
    • Sample topics:
      • natural features: mountains, forests, waterways, local plants and animals
      • human-made features: buildings, bridges, dams, dykes
    • Key question:
      • How does the rural environment differ from the urban environment?
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
Nous façonnons notre environnement, et notre environnement façonne à son tour notre identité et notre mode de vie.
Nos droits, rôles et responsabilités jouent un rôle essentiel dans l’édification de communautés solides.
Les communautés en santé reconnaissent et respectent la diversité des individus, et veillent sur l’environnement local.
 
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions
  • Expliquer l’importance de lieux, de personnes, d’objets ou d’événements d’envergure locale ou personnelle (portée)
  • Poser des questions, faire des déductions par inférence et tirer des conclusions sur le contenu et les caractéristiques de différents types de sources (preuves)
  • Ordonner des objets, des images ou des événements, et faire la distinction entre les choses qui ont changé et les choses qui n’ont pas changé (continuité et changement)
  • Reconnaître les causes et les conséquences d’un événement, d’une décision ou d’un développement dans sa vie personnelle (causes et conséquences)
  • Explorer différents points de vue sur des personnes, des lieux, des questions ou des événements de leur vie (perspective)
  • Relever les dimensions justes et injustes d’un événement, d’une décision ou d’une action dans sa vie, et envisager des plans d’action appropriés (jugement éthique)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les processus d’investigation des sciences humaines pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées et communiquer des conclusions et des décisions:
    • Compétences clés :
      • reconnaître que les cartes représentent des lieux réels et faire le lien entre une représentation graphique et son emplacement réel (p. ex. un endroit dans l’école, un parc dans le quartier)
      • suivre un itinéraire pour atteindre une destination à l’aide d’une représentation graphique (p. ex. une carte illustrée)
      • accéder à des sources d’information audio, visuelles, matérielles ou imprimées
      • tirer de l’information de ses expériences personnelles, de sources orales et de représentations graphiques
      • faire des comparaisons pour déceler des ressemblances et des différences
      • avec l’aide de l’enseignant, avancer des interprétations simples à partir des informations recueillies (p. ex. les familles ont des besoins semblables, les familles ont des différences)
      • utiliser des formes de communication orale, écrite ou graphique pour réaliser des tâches de présentation (p. ex. exposé oral, images sous-titrées)
      • faire un remue-méninges sur un problème donné, en discuter et comparer les solutions possibles
  • Expliquer l’importance de lieux, de personnes, d’objets ou d’événements d’envergure locale ou personnelle:
    • Exemples d’activités:
      • faire un remue-méninges pour dresser une liste des lieux les plus importants de la communauté, et justifier l’importance de ces lieux
      • faire une recherche sur un événement ou un personnage important dans l’histoire de la communauté
    • Question clé :
      • Comment l’importance d’un événement, d’un objet, d’une personne et d’un lieu change-t-elle au cours du temps?
  • Poser des questions, faire des déductions par inférence et tirer des conclusions sur le contenu et les caractéristiques de différents types de sources:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • comparer des photos anciennes et actuelles de lieux dans la communauté et discuter de leur évolution
      • proposer des explications aux événements marquants dans la communauté et comparer ses hypothèses aux explications des historiens et d’autres experts
      • explorer l’histoire d’un personnage important dans la communauté à l’aide de sources comme des articles de journaux, des photographies et des vidéos
  • Ordonner des objets, des images ou des événements, et faire la distinction entre les choses qui ont changé et les choses qui n’ont pas changé:
    • Exemples d’activités :
      • élaborer un schéma chronologique d’événements importants dans la communauté au moyen de photographies ou de dessins
      • comparer les applications technologiques actuelles à celles de l’époque de ses parents ou de ses grands-parents
      • faire la distinction entre des événements prévus et imprévus
content_fr: 
  • Les caractéristiques de la communauté locale qui permettent l’organisation de la communauté et répondent à ses besoins
  • La diversité des cultures, des origines et des points de vue au sein de la communauté locale et des autres communautés
  • Les relations entre une communauté locale et son environnement
  • Les rôles, droits et responsabilités dans la communauté locale
  • Les événements et développements clés dans la communauté locale et dans les communautés autochtones locales
  • Les caractéristiques naturelles et d’origine humaine de l’environnement local
content elaborations fr: 
  • Les caractéristiques de la communauté  locale qui permettent l’organisation de la communauté et répondent à ses besoins:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • gouvernement local
      • services publics
      • services d’urgence
      • police
      • transports
      • commerces
      • parcs et autres espaces récréatifs
      • services financiers
  • La diversité des cultures, des origines et des points de vue au sein de la communauté locale et des autres communautés:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • diversité des langues, des coutumes, des arts, de la musique, des traditions, des fêtes, des façons de cuisiner, des vêtements et des codes vestimentaires
  • Les relations entre une communauté et son environnement:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • secteur des ressources naturelles
      • parcs et autres aires naturelles
      • croissance démographique et projets de construction
      • eau et traitement des eaux usées
    • Questions clés :
      • En quoi ta communauté dépend-elle de l’environnement local?
      • Quels sont les effets des activités de ta communauté sur l’environnement?
  • Les rôles, droits et responsabilités dans la communauté locale:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les droits et les intérêts de l’individu par opposition à l’intérêt public
      • les responsabilités envers les autres et l’environnement
    • Questions clés :
      • Qui prend les décisions? Pourquoi?
      • Comment les décisions touchent-elles différentes personnes?
  • Les événements et développements clés dans la communauté locale et dans les communautés autochtones locales:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • les jalons de l’histoire de la communauté (p. ex. fondation de la communauté, ouverture et fermeture d’entreprises locales, construction de bâtiments)
      • les célébrations et les fêtes
      • les événements culturels
      • la croissance et le déclin d’une communauté
    • Questions clés :
      • Quel est l’événement le plus marquant dans l’histoire de ta communauté?
      • En quoi ta communauté est-elle différente aujourd’hui de ce qu’elle était avant l’arrivée des colons?
  • Les caractéristiques naturelles et d’origine humaine de l’environnement local:
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • caractéristiques naturelles : montagnes, forêts, cours d’eau, plantes et animaux de la région
      • caractéristiques d’origine humaine : bâtiments, ponts, barrages, digues
    • Question clé :
      • Quelles sont les différences entre le milieu urbain et le milieu rural?
PDF Only: 
No
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes