Curriculum Mathematics Grade 4

Subject: 
Mathematics
Grade: 
Grade 4
Big Ideas: 
Fractions and decimals are types of numbers that can represent quantities.
Development of computational fluency and multiplicative thinking requires analysis of patterns and relations in multiplication and division.
Regular changes in patterns can be identified and represented using tools and tables.
Polygons are closed shapes with similar attributes that can be described, measured, and compared.
Analyzing and interpreting experiments in data probability develops an understanding of chance.
 
Big Ideas Elaborations: 
  • numbers:
    • Number: Number represents and describes quantity.
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • What is the relationship between fractions and decimals?
      • How are these fractions (e.g., 1/2 and 7/8) alike and different?
      • How do we use fractions and decimals in our daily life?
      • What stories live in numbers?
      • How do numbers help us communicate and think about place?
      • How do numbers help us communicate and think about ourselves?
  • fluency:
    • Computational Fluency: Computational fluency develops from a strong sense of number.
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • What is the relationship between multiplication and division?
      • What patterns in our number system connect to our understanding of multiplication?
      • How does fluency with basic multiplication facts (e.g., 2x, 3x, 5x) help us compute more complex multiplication facts?
  • patterns:
    • Patterning: We use patterns to represent identified regularities and to make generalizations.
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • What regularities can you identify in these patterns?
      • Where do we see patterns in the world around us?
      • How can we represent increasing and decreasing regularities that we see in number patterns?
      • How do tables and charts help us understand number patterns?
  • attributes:
    • Geometry and Measurement: We can describe, measure, and compare spatial relationships.
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • How are these polygons alike and different?
      • How can we measure polygons?
      • How do the properties of shapes contribute to buildings and design?
  • data:
    • Data and Probability: Analyzing data and chance enables us to compare and interpret.
    • Sample questions to support inquiry with students:
      • How is the probability of an event determined and described?
      • What events in our lives are left to chance?
      • How do probability experiments help us understand chance?
Curricular Competencies: 
Reasoning and analyzing
  • Use reasoning to explore and make connections
  • Estimate reasonably
  • Develop mental math strategies and abilities to make sense of quantities
  • Use technology to explore mathematics
  • Model mathematics in contextualized experiences
Understanding and solving
  • Develop, demonstrate, and apply mathematical understanding through play, inquiry, and problem solving
  • Visualize to explore mathematical concepts
  • Develop and use multiple strategies to engage in problem solving
  • Engage in problem-solving experiences that are connected to place, story, cultural practices, and perspectives relevant to local First Peoples communities, the local community, and other cultures
Communicating and representing
  • Communicate mathematical thinking in many ways
  • Use mathematical vocabulary and language to contribute to mathematical discussions
  • Explain and justify mathematical ideas and decisions
  • Represent mathematical ideas in concrete, pictorial, and symbolic forms
Connecting and reflecting
  • Reflect on mathematical thinking
  • Connect mathematical concepts to each other and to other areas and personal interests
  • Incorporate First Peoples worldviews and perspectives to make connections to mathematical concepts
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Estimate reasonably:
    • estimating by comparing to something familiar (e.g., more than 5, taller than me)
  • mental math strategies:
    • working toward developing fluent and flexible thinking about number
  • technology:
    • calculators, virtual manipulatives, concept-based apps
  • Model:
    • acting it out, using concrete materials, drawing pictures
  • multiple strategies:
    • visual, oral, play, experimental, written, symbolic
  • connected:
    • in daily activities, local and traditional practices, the environment, popular media and news events, cross-curricular integration
    • Have students pose and solve problems or ask questions connected to place, stories, and cultural practices.
  • Communicate:
    • concretely, pictorially, symbolically, and by using spoken or written language to express, describe, explain, justify, and apply mathematical ideas
    • using technology such as screencasting apps, digital photos
  • Explain and justify:
    • using mathematical arguments
    • “Prove it!”
  • concrete, pictorial, and symbolic forms:
    • Use local materials gathered outside for concrete and pictorial representations.
  • Reflect:
    • sharing the mathematical thinking of self and others, including evaluating strategies and solutions, extending, and posing new problems and questions
  • other areas and personal interests:
    • to develop a sense of how mathematics helps us understand ourselves and the world around us (e.g., daily activities, local and traditional practices, the environment, popular media and news events, social justice, and cross-curricular integration)
  • Incorporate:
    • Invite local First Peoples Elders and knowledge keepers to share their knowledge.
  • make connections:
    • Bishop’s cultural practices: counting, measuring, locating, designing, playing, explaining (csus.edu/indiv/o/oreyd/ACP.htm_files/abishop.htm)
    • aboriginaleducation.ca
    • Teaching Mathematics in a First Nations Context, FNESC fnesc.ca/k-7/
Concepts and Content: 
  • number concepts to 10 000
  • decimals to hundredths
  • ordering and comparing fractions
  • addition and subtraction to 10 000
  • multiplication and division of two- or three-digit numbers by one-digit numbers
  • addition and subtraction of decimals to hundredths
  • addition and subtraction facts to 20 (developing computational fluency)
  • multiplication and division facts to 100 (introductory computational strategies)
  • increasing and decreasing patterns, using tables and charts
  • algebraic relationships among quantities
  • one-step equations with an unknown number, using all operations
  • how to tell time with analog and digital clocks, using 12- and 24-hour clocks
  • regular and irregular polygons
  • perimeter of regular and irregular shapes
  • line symmetry
  • one-to-one correspondence and many-to-one correspondence, using bar graphs and pictographs
  • probability experiments
  • financial literacy — monetary calculations, including making change with amounts to 100 dollars and making simple financial decisions
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • number concepts:
    • counting:
      • multiples
      • flexible counting strategies
      • whole number benchmarks
    • Numbers to 10 000 can be arranged and recognized:
      • comparing and ordering numbers
      • estimating large quantities
    • place value:
      • 1000s, 100s, 10s, and 1s
      • understanding the relationship between digit places and their value, to 10 000
  • decimals to hundredths:
    • Fractions and decimals are numbers that represent an amount or quantity.
    • Fractions and decimals can represent parts of a region, set, or linear model.
    • Fractional parts and decimals are equal shares or equal-sized portions of a whole or unit.
    • understanding the relationship between fractions and decimals
  • fractions:
    • comparing and ordering of fractions with common denominators
    • estimating fractions with benchmarks (e.g., zero, half, whole)
    • using concrete and visual models
    • equal partitioning
  • addition and subtraction:
    • using flexible computation strategies, involving taking apart (e.g., decomposing using friendly numbers and compensating) and combining numbers in a variety of ways, regrouping
    • estimating sums and differences to 10 000
    • using addition and subtraction in real-life contexts and problem-based situations
    • whole-class number talks
  • multiplication and division:
    • understanding the relationships between multiplication and division, multiplication and addition, division and subtraction
    • using flexible computation strategies (e.g., decomposing, distributive principle, commutative principle, repeated addition and repeated subtraction)
    • using multiplication and division in real-life contexts and problem-based situations
    • whole-class number talks
  • decimals:
    • estimating decimal sums and differences
    • using visual models, such as base 10 blocks, place-value mats, grid paper, and number lines
    • using addition and subtraction in real-life contexts and problem-based situations
    • whole-class number talks
  • computational fluency:
    • Provide opportunities for authentic practice, building on previous grade-level addition and subtraction facts.
    • flexible use of mental math strategies
  • facts:
    • Provide opportunities for concrete and pictorial representations of multiplication.
    • building computational fluency
    • Use games to provide opportunities for authentic practice of multiplication computations.
    • looking for patterns in numbers, such as in a hundred chart, to further develop understanding of multiplication computation
    • Connect multiplication to skip-counting.
    • Connecting multiplication to division and repeated addition.
    • Memorization of facts is not intended for this level.
    • Students will become more fluent with these facts.
    • using mental math strategies, such as doubling or halving
    • Students should be able to recall the following multiplication facts by the end of Grade 4 (2s, 5s, 10s).
  • patterns:
    • Change in patterns can be represented in charts, graphs, and tables.
    • using words and numbers to describe increasing and decreasing patterns
    • fish stocks in lakes, life expectancies
  • algebraic relationships:
    • representing and explaining one-step equations with an unknown number
    • describing pattern rules, using words and numbers from concrete and pictorial representations
    • planning a camping or hiking trip; planning for quantities and materials needed per individual and group over time
  • one-step equations:
    • one-step equations for all operations involving an unknown number (e.g.,  ___ + 4 = 15, 15 – □ = 11)
    • start unknown (e.g., n + 15 = 20; 20 – 15 = □)
    • change unknown (e.g., 12 + n = 20)
    • result unknown (e.g., 6 + 13 = __)
  • tell time:
    • understanding how to tell time with analog and digital clocks, using 12- and 24-hour clocks
    • understanding the concept of a.m. and p.m.
    • understanding the number of minutes in an hour
    • understanding the concepts of using a circle and of using fractions in telling time (e.g., half past, quarter to)
    • telling time in five-minute intervals
    • telling time to the nearest minute
    • First Peoples use of numbers in time and seasons, represented by seasonal cycles and moon cycles (e.g., how position of sun, moon, and stars is used to determine times for traditional activities, navigation)
  • polygons:
    • describing and sorting regular and irregular polygons based on multiple attributes
    • investigating polygons (polygons are closed shapes with similar attributes)
    • Yup’ik border patterns
  • perimeter:
    • using geoboards and grids to create, represent, measure, and calculate perimeter
  • line symmetry:
    • using concrete materials such as pattern blocks to create designs that have a mirror image within them
    • First Peoples art, borders, birchbark biting, canoe building
    • Visit a structure designed by First Peoples in the local community and have the students examine the symmetry, balance, and patterns within the structure, then replicate simple models of the architecture focusing on the patterns they noted in the original.
  • one-to-one correspondence:
    • many-to-one correspondence: one symbol represents a group or value (e.g., on a bar graph, one square may represent five cookies)
  • probability experiments:
    • predicting single outcomes (e.g., when you spin using one spinner and it lands on a single colour)
    • using spinners, rolling dice, pulling objects out of a bag
    • recording results using tallies
    • Dene/Kaska hand games, Lahal stick games
  • financial literacy:
    • making monetary calculations, including decimal notation in real-life contexts and problem-based situations
    • applying a variety of strategies, such as counting up, counting back, and decomposing, to calculate totals and make change
    • making simple financial decisions involving earning, spending, saving, and giving
    • equitable trade rules
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
Les fractions et les nombres décimaux sont des types de nombres qui peuvent servir à représenter des quantités.
Pour acquérir une facilité à manipuler les nombres et des habiletés à effectuer des calculs, en particulier la multiplication, il est nécessaire d’analyser des régularités et des relations entre la multiplication et la division.
On peut reconnaître les changements récurrents dans les régularités et les représenter à l’aide d’outils et de tables.
Les polygones sont des figures géométriques fermées avec des caractéristiques communes que l’on peut décrire, mesurer et comparer.
Analyser et interpréter des données produites par une expérience de probabilité permet de comprendre le concept d’événement aléatoire (hasard).
 
Big Ideas Elaborations FR: 
  • Nombres :
    • Nombre : Un nombre représente et décrit une quantité.
      • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion des élèves :
        • Quelle est la relation entre les fractions et les nombres décimaux?
        • Quelles sont les ressemblances entre ces fractions (p. ex.  1/2 et 7/8)? Quelles sont les différences?
        • Comment utilise-t-on les fractions et les nombres décimaux dans la vie de tous les jours?
        • Quelles histoires retrouve-t-on dans les nombres?
        • Comment les nombres permettent-ils de communiquer une position et d’y réfléchir?
        • Comment les nombres aident-ils la discussion et la réflexion sur nous-mêmes?
  • Facilité à manipuler les nombres :
    • Habileté à effectuer des calculs : Pour acquérir des habiletés à effectuer des calculs, il faut acquérir un bon sens du nombre.
      • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion des élèves :
        • Quelle est la relation entre la multiplication et la division?
        • Quelles régularités de notre système numérique sont liées à notre compréhension de la multiplication?
        • En quoi la connaissance des tables de multiplication élémentaires (p. ex.  2x, 3x, 5x) peut-elle nous aider à construire des tables de multiplication plus complexes?
  • Régularités :
    • Régularités : On utilise les régularités pour représenter des récurrences connues et faire des généralisations.
      • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion des élèves :
        • Quelles récurrences peux-tu reconnaître dans ces régularités?
        • Où voit-on des régularités dans le monde qui nous entoure?
        • Comment peut-on représenter les récurrences croissantes et décroissantes que l’on retrouve dans les régularités numériques?
        • Comment les tables et les grilles peuvent-elles nous aider à comprendre les régularités numériques?
  • Caractéristiques :
    • Géométrie et mesure : On peut décrire, mesurer et comparer les relations géométriques.
      • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion des élèves :
        • Quelles sont les ressemblances entre ces polygones? Quelles sont les différences?
        • Comment peut-on mesurer les polygones?
        • Comment les propriétés des figures géométriques sont-elles utilisées en construction, en design?
  • Données :
    • Données et probabilité : L’analyse des données et la probabilité nous permettent de faire des comparaisons et des interprétations.
      • Questions pour appuyer la réflexion des élèves :
        • Comment peut-on déterminer et décrire la probabilité d’un événement?
        • Quels événements de notre vie dépendent-ils du hasard?
        • Comment les expériences de probabilité nous aident-elles à comprendre le hasard?
competencies_fr: 
Raisonner et analyser
  • Utiliser le raisonnement pour explorer et faire des liens
  • Estimer raisonnablement
  • Concevoir des stratégies de calcul mental et acquérir des habiletés propres au calcul mental pour comprendre la notion de quantité
  • Utiliser la technologie pour explorer les mathématiques
  • Modéliser les objets et les relations mathématiques dans des expériences contextualisées
Comprendre et résoudre
  • Perfectionner sa compréhension des mathématiques, en faire état et l’appliquer par le jeu, l’investigation et la résolution de problèmes
  • Explorer des concepts mathématiques par la visualisation
  • Élaborer et appliquer des stratégies multiples pour résoudre des problèmes
  • Réaliser des expériences de résolution de problèmes qui font le lien de manière pertinente avec les lieux, les histoires, les pratiques culturelles et les perspectives des peuples autochtones de la région, de la communauté locale et d’autres cultures
Communiquer et représenter
  • Communiquer un concept mathématique de plusieurs façons
  • Utiliser le vocabulaire et les symboles mathématiques pour contribuer à des discussions de nature mathématique
  • Expliquer et justifier des concepts et des solutions en se basant sur les mathématiques
  • Représenter un concept mathématique de façon concrète, graphique et symbolique
Faire des liens et réfléchir
  • Réfléchir sur la pensée mathématique
  • Faire des liens entre différents concepts mathématiques, et entre des concepts mathématiques et d’autres domaines et intérêts personnels
  • Intégrer les perspectives et les visions du monde des peuples autochtones pour faire des liens avec des concepts mathématiques
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Estimer raisonnablement :
    • Estimer en comparant à quelque chose de connu (p. ex.  plus que 5, plus grand que moi)
  • Stratégies de calcul mental :
    • acquérir une flexibilité et une facilité de réflexion concernant la manipulation des nombres
  • Technologie :
    • calculatrices, objets virtuels, applications basées sur des concepts
  • Modéliser :
    • mimer, utiliser du matériel concret, s’aider de dessins
  • Stratégies multiples :
    • visuelle, orale, par le jeu, expérimentale, écrite, symbolique
  • qui font le lien :
    • avec les activités quotidiennes, les pratiques locales et traditionnelles, l’environnement, les médias populaires, les événements d’actualité; intégration interdisciplinaire
    • demander aux élèves de formuler et de résoudre des problèmes et de poser des questions qui font référence aux lieux, aux histoires et aux pratiques culturelles
  • Communiquer :
    • de plusieurs façons (concrète, graphique, symbolique, à l’oral ou à l’écrit) pour exprimer, décrire, expliquer, justifier et appliquer des concepts mathématiques
    • à l’aide de la technologie (p. ex.  logiciels de vidéographie, photos numériques)
  • Expliquer et justifier :
    • au moyen d’arguments mathématiques
    • « Prouve-le! »
  • de façon concrète, graphique et symbolique :
    • utiliser du matériel concret trouvé à l’extérieur pour fabriquer des représentations concrètes et graphiques
  • Réfléchir :
    • présenter le fruit de ses propres réflexions mathématiques et de celles d’autres personnes, notamment évaluer les stratégies et les solutions, comprendre des concepts et formuler de nouveaux problèmes et de nouvelles questions
  • Autres domaines et intérêts personnels :
    • s’ouvrir au fait que les mathématiques peuvent aider à se connaître et à comprendre le monde qui nous entoure (p. ex.  activités quotidiennes, pratiques locales et traditionnelles, environnement, médias populaires, événements d’actualité, justice sociale et intégration interdisciplinaire)
  • Intégrer :
    • inviter des Aînés et des détenteurs du savoir des peuples autochtones de la région à partager leurs connaissances
  • Faire des liens :
    • pratiques culturelles selon Bishop : compter, mesurer, localiser, concevoir, jouer, expliquer (csus.edu/indiv/o/oreyd/ACP.htm_files/abishop.htm) (en anglais seulement)
    • aboriginaleducation.ca (en anglais seulement)
    • Teaching Mathematics in a First Nations Context, FNESC fnesc.ca/k-7/ (en anglais seulement)
content_fr: 
  • les concepts numériques jusqu’à 10 000
  • les nombres décimaux jusqu’à la deuxième décimale
  • les fractions : les ordonner et les comparer
  • l’addition et la soustraction jusqu’à 10 000
  • la multiplication et la division de nombres à deux ou trois chiffres par des nombres à un chiffre
  • l’addition et la soustraction de nombres décimaux jusqu’à la deuxième décimale
  • les tables d’addition et de soustraction jusqu’à 20 (renforcement des habiletés à effectuer des calculs)
  • les tables de multiplication et de division jusqu’à 100 (introduction des stratégies de calcul)
  • les régularités croissantes et décroissantes, au moyen de tables et de graphiques
  • les relations algébriques entre des quantités
  • la résolution d’équations en une étape avec une inconnue et toutes les opérations
  • l’heure : il saura la lire sur une horloge analogique et numérique, et avec des notations de 12 et de 24 heures
  • les polygones réguliers et irréguliers
  • le périmètre de figures géométriques régulières et irrégulières
  • la symétrie linéaire
  • la correspondance biunivoque et la correspondance multivoque, au moyen de diagrammes à barres et de pictogrammes
  • les expériences de probabilité
  • la littératie financière – calculs d’argent, y compris rendre la monnaie avec des montants jusqu’à 100 dollars; prise de décisions financières simples
content elaborations fr: 
  • Concepts numériques :
    • compter :
      • multiples
      • stratégies de calcul variées
      • nombres entiers comme référents
    • les nombres jusqu’à 10 000 peuvent être classés et reconnus :
      • comparer et classer les nombres
      • estimer des grandes quantités
    • valeur de position :
      • milliers, centaines, dizaines, et unités
      • comprendre la relation entre la position des chiffres et leur valeur, jusqu’à 10 000
  • Nombres décimaux jusqu’à la deuxième décimale :
    • les fractions et les décimales sont des nombres qui représentent un montant ou une quantité
    • les fractions et les nombres décimaux représentent des parties d’une région, d’un ensemble ou d’un modèle linéaire
    • les parties d’une fraction et les nombres décimaux sont des parts égales ou des portions de même taille d’un tout ou d’une unité
    • comprendre la relation entre les fractions et les nombres décimaux
  • Fractions :
    • comparer et classer des fractions avec un dénominateur commun
    • estimer des fractions à l’aide de référents (p. ex.  zéro, moitié, tout)
    • utiliser des modèles concrets et visuels
    • partage en parts égales
  • Addition et soustraction :
    • utiliser des stratégies de calcul variées, où il faut séparer (p. ex.  décomposer à l’aide de nombres familiers et compenser) et combiner des nombres de différentes façons, regrouper
    • estimer des sommes et des différences jusqu’à 10 000
    • utiliser l’addition et la soustraction pour des situations de la vie quotidienne et des résolutions de problèmes
    • discussions avec la classe sur les nombres
  • Multiplication et division :
    • comprendre la relation qui existe entre la multiplication et la division, la multiplication et l’addition, la division et la soustraction
    • utiliser des stratégies de calcul variées (p. ex.  décomposer, concept de distributivité, concept de commutativité, addition répétée et soustraction répétée)
    • utiliser la multiplication et la division dans des situations de la vie quotidienne et dans la résolution de problèmes
    • discussions avec la classe sur les nombres
  • Nombres décimaux :
    • estimer des sommes et des différences de nombres décimaux
    • utiliser des modèles visuels, comme des blocs de base dix, des tables de valeur de position, du papier quadrillé et des droites numériques
    • utiliser l’addition et la soustraction pour des situations de la vie quotidienne et des résolutions de problèmes
    • discussions avec la classe sur les nombres
  • Habileté à effectuer des calculs :
    • offrir des occasions de faire des exercices authentiques, en se basant sur les tables d’addition et de soustraction des niveaux précédents
    • utilisation adéquate de stratégies de calcul mental
  • Tables :
    • offrir des occasions de faire des représentations concrètes et graphiques de multiplications
    • acquérir des habiletés concernant les opérations arithmétiques
    • utiliser des jeux pour faire des exercices authentiques de multiplication
    • chercher des régularités dans les nombres, p. ex.  avec une grille de cent, pour améliorer sa compréhension des multiplications
    • faire un lien entre la multiplication et le calcul par intervalles
    • faire un lien entre la multiplication et la division ainsi qu’avec l’addition répétée
    • la mémorisation des tables n’est pas prévue à ce niveau
    • les élèves vont acquérir une plus grande facilité avec ces tables
    • utiliser des stratégies de calcul mental, comme le double et la moitié
    • les élèves devraient se rappeler les tables de multiplication suivantes à la fin de la 4e année (table de 2, table de 5 et et table de 10)
  • Régularités :
    • les changements dans les régularités peuvent être représentés par des grilles, des graphiques et des tables
    • utiliser des mots et des nombres pour décrire des régularités croissantes et décroissantes
    • réserves de poissons dans les lacs, espérance de vie
  • Relations algébriques :
    • représenter et expliquer des résolutions d’équations en une étape avec un nombre inconnu
    • décrire des règles de régularité, en utilisant des mots et des nombres, à partir de représentations concrètes et graphiques
    • planifier un voyage de camping ou une randonnée; prévoir les quantités et le matériel nécessaires par personne et par groupe selon la durée prévue
  • Résolution d’équations en une étape :
    • les résolutions d’équations en une étape pour toutes les opérations avec une inconnue (p. ex.  ___ + 4 = 15, 15 – □ = 11)
    • commencer par une inconnue (p. ex.  n + 15 = 20; 20 – 15 = □)
    • changer l’inconnue (p. ex.  12 + n = 20)
    • résultat inconnu (p. ex.  6 + 13 = __)
  • L’heure :
    • apprendre à lire l’heure sur une horloge analogique et numérique, avec des notations de 12 et de de 24 heures
    • comprendre le concept d’a.m. et de p.m.
    • comprendre combien il y a de minutes dans une heure
    • comprendre le principe du cercle et des fractions pour lire l’heure (p. ex.  et demie, moins le quart)
    • lire l’heure par  intervalles de cinq minutes
    • lire l’heure à la minute la plus près
    • utilisation des nombres pour le temps et les saisons par les peuples autochtones, et représentation par cycles de saisons et cycles lunaires (p. ex.  comment la position du Soleil, de la Lune et des étoiles sert à déterminer le moment pour les activités traditionnelles, la navigation)
  • Polygones :
    • décrire et classer des polygones réguliers et irréguliers en utilisant des caractéristiques multiples
    • explorer les polygones (les polygones sont des figures géométriques fermées avec des caractéristiques semblables)
    • régularités dans les bordures des Yupik
  • Périmètre :
    • utiliser des géoplans et des grilles pour élaborer, représenter, mesurer et calculer un périmètre
  • Symétrie linéaire :
    • utiliser des objets concrets comme des mosaïques géométriques pour élaborer des motifs avec une image miroir
    • art autochtone, bordures, dessins par morsures sur écorce de bouleau, construction de canot
    • visiter une structure conçue par des Autochtones de la région et laisser les élèves examiner la symétrie, l’équilibre et les régularités qu’on y voit, puis leur demander de construire des modèles simples de l’architecture originale en se concentrant sur les régularités qu’ils ont notées
  • Correspondance biunivoque :
    • correspondance multivoque : un symbole représente un groupe ou une valeur (p. ex.  dans un graphique à barres, un carré peut représenter cinq biscuits)
  • Expériences de probabilité :
    • prédire un résultat unique (p. ex.  obtenir une couleur en faisant tourner une aiguille sur un cadran)
    • faire tourner une aiguille sur un cadran, lancer un dé, piger des objets dans un sac
    • noter les résultats avec des traits
    • jeux de mains dénés/kaska, jeux de bâtonnets lahal
  • Littératie financière :
    • faire des calculs monétaires, avec des valeurs décimales, pour des situations de la vie quotidienne et des résolutions de problèmes
    • utiliser diverses stratégies, comme compter en ordre croissant, en ordre décroissant et décomposer, pour calculer le total et rendre la monnaie
    • prendre des décisions financières simples en lien avec le revenu, les dépenses, l’épargne et le don
    • règles de commerce équitable
PDF Only: 
No
PDF Grade-Set: 
k-9
Curriculum Status: 
2016/17
Has French Translation: 
Yes