Curriculum Justice sociale 12e

Subject: 
Social Justice
Grade: 
Grade 12
Big Ideas: 
Social justice issues are interconnected.
Individual worldviews shape and inform our understanding of social justice issues.
The causes of social injustice are complex and have lasting impacts on society.
Social justice initiatives can transform individuals and systems.
 
Curricular Competencies: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Assess and compare the significance of people, places, events, or developments at particular times and places, and determine what is revealed about issues of social justice in the past and present (significance)
  • Assess the justification for competing accounts after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence, including data (evidence)
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups and individuals at different times and places (continuity and change)
  • Determine and assess the long- and short-term causes and consequences, and the intended and unintended consequences, of an event, legislative and judicial decision, development, policy, or movement (cause and consequence)
  • Explain different perspectives on past and present people, places, issues, and events, and distinguish between worldviews of the past or present (perspective)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about controversial actions in the past or present after considering the context and standards of right and wrong (ethical judgment)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations: 
  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions:
    • Key skills:
      • Draw conclusions about a problem, an issue, or a topic.
      • Assess and defend a variety of positions on a problem, an issue, or a topic.
      • Demonstrate leadership by planning, implementing, and assessing strategies to address a problem or an issue.
      • Identify and clarify a problem or issue.
      • Evaluate and organize collected data (e.g., in outlines, summaries, notes, timelines, charts).
      • Interpret information and data from a variety of maps, graphs, and tables.
      • Interpret and present data in a variety of forms (e.g., oral, written, and graphic).
      • Accurately cite sources.
      • Construct graphs, tables, and maps to communicate ideas and information, demonstrating appropriate use of grids, scales, legends, and contours.
  • Assess and compare the significance of people, places, events, or developments at particular times and places, and determine what is revealed about issues of social justice in the past and present:
    • Key questions:
      • What factors can cause people, places, events, or developments to become more or less significant?
      • What factors can make people, places, events, or developments significant to different people?
      • What criteria should be used to assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments?
    • Sample activities:
      • Use criteria to rank the most important people, places, events, or developments in the current unit of study.
      • Compare how different groups assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments.
  • Assess the justification for competing accounts after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence, including data:
    • Key questions:
      • What criteria should be used to assess the reliability of a source?
      • How much evidence is sufficient in order to support a conclusion?
      • How much about various people, places, events, or developments can be known and how much is unknowable?
    • Sample activities:
      • Compare and contrast multiple accounts of the same event and evaluate their usefulness as historical sources.
      • Examine what sources are available and what sources are missing and evaluate how the available evidence shapes your perspective on the people, places, events, or developments studied.
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups and individuals at different times and places:
    • Key questions:
      • What factors lead to changes or continuities affecting groups of people differently?
      • How do gradual processes and more sudden rates of change affect people living through them? Which method of change has more of an effect on society?
      • How are periods of change or continuity perceived by the people living through them? How does this compare to how they are perceived after the fact?
    • Sample activity:
      • Compare how different groups benefited or suffered as a result of a particular change.
  • Determine and assess the long- and short-term causes and consequences, and the intended and unintended consequences, of an event, legislative and judicial decision, development, policy, or movement:
    • Key questions:
      • What is the role of chance in particular events, decisions, or developments?
      • Are there events with positive long-term consequences but negative short-term consequences, or vice versa?
    • Sample activities:
      • Assess whether the results of a particular action were intended or unintended consequences.
      • Evaluate the most important causes or consequences of various events, decisions, or developments.
  • Explain different perspectives on past and present people, places, issues, and events, and distinguish between worldviews of the past or present:
    • Key questions:
      • What sources of information can people today use to try to understand what people in different times and places believed?
      • How much can we generalize about values and beliefs in a given society or time period?
      • Is it fair to judge people of the past using modern values?
    • Sample activity:
      • Explain how the beliefs of people on different sides of the same issue influence their opinions. 
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about controversial actions in the past or present after considering the context and standards of right and wrong:
    • Key questions:
      • What is the difference between implicit and explicit values?
      • Why should we consider the historical, political, and social context when making ethical judgments?
      • Should people of today have any responsibility for actions taken in the past?
      • Can people of the past be celebrated for great achievements if they have also done things considered unethical today? 
    • Sample activities:
      • Assess the responsibility of historical figures for an important event. Assess how much responsibility should be assigned to different people, and evaluate whether their actions were justified given the historical context.
      • Examine various media sources on a topic and assess how much of the language contains implicit and explicit moral judgments.
Concepts and Content: 
  • definitions, frameworks, and interpretations of social justice
  • self-identity and an individual's relationship to others
  • social justice issues
  • social injustices in Canada and the world affecting individuals, groups, and society
  • governmental and non-governmental organizations in issues of social justice and injustice
  • processes, methods, and approaches individuals, groups, and institutions use to promote social justice
Concepts and Content Elaborations: 
  • definitions, frameworks, and interpretations of social justice:
    • Sample topics:
      • definitions of social justice in local contexts
      • equity and equality
      • values, morality, ethics
      • social service, social responsibility (e.g., Elizabeth Fry Society; Malala Fund)
      • justice (e.g., restitution, restorative justice)
  • self-identity and an individual's relationship to others:
    • Sample topics:
      • privilege and power
      • diverse belief systems and worldviews of minority groups
      • traditional and unceded territories of indigenous peoples
      • inclusive and non-inclusive language
  • social justice issues:
    • Sample topics:
      • connections between and among such issues as:
        • race
        • poverty
        • LGBTQ rights
        • status of women
        • environmental and ecological justice
        • peace and globalization
        • disabilities
        • other marginalized and vulnerable groups
  • social injustices in Canada and the world affecting individuals, groups, and society:
    • Sample topics:
      • individual ideas, thoughts, beliefs, and actions
      • group ideas, thoughts, beliefs, and actions:
        • Roma
        • women (e.g., education for girls in Afghanistan; property rights for women in the Middle East)
        • decriminalization of homosexuals
        • Shia and Suni minorities
        • Syria
        • Israel/Palestine
  • policies and practices of institutions and systems:
    • United Nations, Declaration of the Rights of the Child
    • indigenous peoples
    • marriage and civil union laws
    • genocide prevention and the responsibility to protect
  • governmental and non-governmental organizations in issues of social justice and injustice:
    • Sample topics:
      • international laws
      • UN resolutions and declarations
      • Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
      • human rights codes
      • civil and criminal laws
      • indigenous rights in Canada and globally
  • processes, methods, and approaches individuals, groups, and institutions use to promote social justice:
    • Sample topics:
      • activism, advocacy, and ally-building
      • dispute and conflict resolution processes and practices
      • social media and technology
      • schooling and education
Status: 
Update and Regenerate Nodes
Big Ideas FR: 
Les enjeux de justice sociale sont interreliés.
Les visions du monde des individus influencent notre façon de comprendre les enjeux de justice sociale.
Les causes de l’injustice sociale sont complexes et ont des effets durables sur la société.
Les initiatives de justice sociale peuvent transformer les individus et les systèmes.
 
competencies_fr: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les démarches d’investigation liées à l’étude des sciences humaines et sociales pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées; et communiquer ses résultats et ses conclusions
  • Déterminer et comparer l’importance que peuvent revêtir les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses dans des contextes particuliers, et déterminer ce qui est ainsi révélé des enjeux de justice sociale d’hier et d’aujourd’hui (portée)
  • Déterminer ce qui sous-tend les récits contradictoires après avoir étudié les points de divergence, la fiabilité des sources et le bien-fondé des preuves, notamment les données (preuves)
  • Comparer et opposer les éléments de continuité et de changement selon les groupes et les individus, les lieux et les époques (continuité et changement)
  • Déterminer et évaluer les causes et les conséquences à court et à long terme, ainsi que les conséquences prévues et imprévues d’un événement, d’une décision législative ou judiciaire, d’un développement, d’une politique ou d’un mouvement (cause et conséquence)
  • Expliquer différents points de vue au sujet de personnes, de lieux, d’enjeux ou d’événements du passé ou du présent, et établir la distinction entre visions du monde d’hier et celles d’aujourd’hui (perspective)
  • Porter des jugements éthiques raisonnés sur des actions du passé et du présent après avoir réfléchi au contexte et aux normes gouvernant les notions de bien et de mal (jugement éthique)
Curricular Competencies Elaborations FR: 
  • Utiliser les compétences et les démarches d'investigation liées à l'étude des sciences humaines et sociales pour poser des questions, recueillir, interpréter et analyser des idées; et communiquer ses résultats et ses conclusions :
    • Compétences clés :
      • Tirer des conclusions sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • Évaluer et défendre divers points de vue sur un problème, un enjeu ou un sujet
      • Faire preuve d'initiative en planifiant, en adoptant et en évaluant des stratégies pour aborder un problème ou un enjeu
      • Relever et clarifier un problème ou un enjeu
      • Évaluer et organiser les données recueillies (p. ex. à partir de plans, de sommaires, de notes, de schémas chronologiques, de tableaux)
      • Interpréter l'information et les données provenant de cartes, graphiques et tableaux divers
      • Interpréter et présenter de l'information ou des données sous diverses formes (p. ex. orale, écrite et graphique)
      • Citer ses sources avec exactitude
      • Préparer des graphiques, des tableaux et des cartes pour communiquer des idées et de l'information, en démontrant un usage approprié des grilles, des échelles, des légendes et des courbes
  • Déterminer et comparer l'importance que peuvent revêtir les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses dans des contextes particuliers, et déterminer ce qui est ainsi révélé des enjeux de justice sociale d'hier et d'aujourd'hui :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels sont les facteurs qui font en sorte que les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses revêtent une importance plus ou moins grande?
      • Quels sont les facteurs qui déterminent l'importance que diverses personnes accordent aux autres, aux lieux, aux événements ou au cours des choses?
      • Quels critères devrait-on appliquer pour évaluer l'importance des personnes, des lieux, des événements et du cours des choses?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Utiliser des critères pour attribuer différents degrés d'importance aux personnes, aux lieux, aux événements et au cours des choses dans le cadre de l'unité d'apprentissage actuelle
      • Comparer la façon dont divers groupes évaluent l'importance des personnes, des lieux, des événements ou du cours des choses
  • Déterminer ce qui sous-tend les récits contradictoires après avoir étudié les points de divergence, la fiabilité des sources et le bien-fondé des preuves, notamment les données :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels critères devrait-on appliquer pour évaluer la fiabilité d'une source?
      • Combien de preuves sont suffisantes pour étayer une conclusion?
      • Quelle part des personnes, des lieux, des événements et du cours des choses peut-on connaître et quelle part est-il impossible de connaître?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Comparer et opposer les comptes rendus multiples d'un même événement et évaluer leur utilité à titre de sources historiques
      • Déterminer quelles sont les sources accessibles et les sources manquantes, et l'influence des preuves disponibles sur le point de vue que nous avons sur les personnes, les lieux, les événements ou le cours des choses à l'étude
  • Comparer et opposer les éléments de continuité et de changement selon les groupes et les individus, les lieux et les époques :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quels facteurs mènent à des situations de continuité ou de changement qui affectent différemment divers groupes?
      • Comment les processus graduels et les changements plus soudains affectent-ils les personnes qui les vivent? Quel processus de changement exerce plus d'effet sur la société?
      • Comment perçoit-on les périodes de continuité ou de changement lorsqu'on les vit par opposition à après coup?
    • Exemple d'activités :
      • Comparer la façon dont différents groupes ont profité d'un changement particulier ou en ont été éprouvés
  • Déterminer et évaluer les causes et les conséquences à court et à long terme, ainsi que les conséquences prévues et imprévues d'un événement, d'une décision législative ou judiciaire, d'un développement, d'une politique ou d'un mouvement :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quel rôle le hasard joue-t-il dans les événements, les décisions ou le cours des choses?
      • Certains événements ont-ils des retombées à long terme positives mais des conséquences immédiates négatives, ou vice versa?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Déterminer si les résultats d'une action donnée sont des conséquences intentionnelles ou non
      • Déterminer les principales causes et conséquences de divers événements, décisions ou cours des choses
  • Expliquer différents points de vue au sujet de personnes, de lieux, d'enjeux ou d'événements du passé ou du présent, et établir la distinction entre visions du monde d'hier et celles d'aujourd'hui  :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelles sources d'information peut-on aujourd'hui utiliser pour essayer de comprendre ce que croyaient les gens de diverses époques et divers lieux?
      • Jusqu'à quel point peut-on généraliser les valeurs et les croyances d'une société ou d'une époque données?
      • Est-il équitable de juger les acteurs de l'histoire en utilisant des valeurs modernes?
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Expliquer comment des personnes qui divergent d'opinion sur un même enjeu peuvent être influencées par leurs croyances
  • Porter des jugements éthiques raisonnés sur des actions du passé et du présent après avoir réfléchi au contexte et aux normes gouvernant les notions de bien et de mal :
    • Questions clés :
      • Quelle est la différence entre valeurs implicites et valeurs explicites?
      • Pourquoi devrait-on tenir compte du contexte historique, politique et social lorsque l'on porte des jugements éthiques?
      • Doit-on aujourd'hui assumer la responsabilité des actions du passé?
      • Doit-on célébrer les personnages historiques pour leurs réalisations s'ils ont aussi posé des gestes aujourd'hui considérés comme étant contraires à l'éthique? 
    • Exemples d'activités :
      • Évaluer la responsabilité de personnages historiques face à un événement important. Évaluer quel degré de responsabilité doit être attribué à différentes personnes et déterminer si leurs actions étaient bien fondées dans un contexte historique donné
      • Étudier diverses sources médiatiques sur un enjeu et évaluer jusqu'à quel point le langage contient des jugements moraux implicites ou explicites
content_fr: 
  • Définitions, cadres et interprétations de la justice sociale
  • Identité personnelle et relation des individus les uns avec les autres
  • Enjeux de justice sociale
  • Injustices sociales au Canada et dans le monde qui affectent les individus, les groupes et la société
  • Organismes gouvernementaux et non gouvernementaux qui sont concernés par les enjeux de justice sociale et d'injustice
  • Processus, méthodes et démarches individuelles, collectives et institutionnelles pour promouvoir la justice sociale
content elaborations fr: 
  • Définitions, cadres et interprétations de la justice sociale :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • définition de la justice sociale dans des contextes locaux
      • équité et égalité
      • valeurs, moralité, éthique
      • service social, responsabilité sociale (p. ex. Société Elizabeth Fry, Fondation Malala)
      • justice (restitution, justice réparatrice, etc.)
  • Identité personnelle et relation des individus les uns avec les autres :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • privilège et pouvoir
      • divers systèmes de croyances et diverses visions du monde des groupes minoritaires
      • territoires traditionnels et non cédés des peuples autochtones
      • langage favorisant l'inclusion ou l'exclusion
  • Enjeux de justice sociale :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • liens entre sujets tels que :
        • race/ethnie
        • pauvreté
        • droits des LGBTQ
        • statut de la femme
        • justice environnementale et écologique
        • paix et mondialisation
        • handicaps
        • autres groupes marginalisés et vulnérables
  • Injustices sociales au Canada et dans le monde qui affectent les individus, les groupes et la société :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • idées, réflexions, croyances et actions des individus
      • idées, réflexions, croyances et actions des groupes :
        • Roms
        • femmes (p. ex. scolarisation des jeunes Afghanes, droits fonciers pour les femmes du Moyen-Orient)
        • décriminalisation de l'homosexualité
        • minorités chiites et sunnites
        • Syrie
        • Israël/Palestine
      • politiques et pratiques des institutions et des systèmes :
        • Nations Unies, Déclaration des droits de l'enfant
        • peuples autochtones
        • lois du mariage et de l'union civile
        • prévention des génocides et responsabilité de protection
  • Organismes gouvernementaux et non gouvernementaux qui sont concernés par les enjeux de justice sociale et d'injustice :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • droit international
      • résolutions et déclarations de l'ONU
      • Charte canadienne des droits et libertés
      • codes des droits de la personne
      • droit civil et droit criminel
      • droits des peuples autochtones au Canada et dans le monde
  • Processus, méthodes et démarches individuelles, collectives et institutionnelles pour promouvoir la justice sociale :
    • Exemples de sujets :
      • activisme, défense de causes et alliances
      • processus et pratiques de résolution de conflits
      • médias sociaux et technologie
      • éducation et scolarisation
PDF Only: 
Yes
Curriculum Status: 
2019/20
Has French Translation: 
Yes